Post-Bac Program Information

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

*Key Questions to Ask About Postbac Programs
*Adapted from the article by Gale Lang, MSS, in the The Advisor, Dec. 2001, Vol. 22, No. 1

What exactly are post-bac programs?
The phrase “post-bac programs” refers to programs geared for the college graduate who wants to apply to medical/dental/vet schools. They are offered by undergraduate institutions, graduate schools, and medical schools.

No, and you should explore them carefully to ensure they meet your needs.

Do they serve the same kinds of students?
No, some are designed for “career changers”, or those that have not yet completed the science prerequisites. Others are for science students that would like to enhance their current records. And still others are particularly geared for underrepresented minorities in the health professions with or without science backgrounds.

How can I distinguish between programs?
Most program literature or web sites will clearly state their target student populations. Read carefully!

How do I know which program will best suit my needs?
First, develop your profile by honestly answering these questions:

  • Have I taken the required courses for admission to health professions?
  • Can I develop into a strong science student?
  • Am I making an informed decision about choosing a career in health care
  • Have I “tested out” my interest by volunteering or otherwise learning more about medicine and health care?
  • Do I have a commitment to service to others?
  • Do I have the stamina and commitment, the personal, inner resources as well as the financial resources, to develop a year or two in premedical preparation after I graduate?

If you answered “YES” to most of the above questions then read on.

If you have NOT taken the premed courses, read this section:

  • Do I want a formal or informal program?
  • Where is the program located? Is this a public or private institution? Small college or big university?
  • What is the tuition? Is financial aid available? How much and for how long?
  • Are there linkages to medical schools or other health professional schools?
  • Can I study full-time, part-time or either, depending on my needs? Are the classes held in the evening or during the day? Can I keep my job if I want/need to?
  • Do I take courses with undergraduates, or are there special sections for the post-bac students?
  • Who will teach my courses?
  • Will I be guaranteed a space in the classes and labs I will need to take?
  • Will I have access to advising from the pre-health advisor? How accessible is that person? Will I receive an evaluation letter from this program?
  • Is there assistance in finding a health related internship or job?
  • Is there help planning the “glide year” (the year of application process while still in the program)? Are there lectures, workshops on applying, and so on?
  • Is there academic assistance, such as tutoring? It is free?
  • Is there a community of students of which I will be a part?
  • Will there be help with MCAT preparation?

If you HAVE taken the requisite science courses, read this section:

  • Why do I believe I can improve my record? Is that a realistic goal for me?

If you answered “YES”, then ask yourself all of the questions in the section above, plus the following:

  • If I need to improve on the MCAT, how will I do that?
  • Should I take further undergraduate courses or move on to graduate courses?
  • Have I exhausted the range of undergraduate courses available to me? Do I have room to take more at UCLA under my maximum unit total?
  • If I want a graduate program, how do I decide between the “Special Master’s” programs and the more traditional Master of Science? Special Master’s programs are usually affiliated with medical schools. They tend to offer a more accelerated, intense pace that is most like medical school curricula.
  • If I do not ultimately gain admission to medical/dental/vet school, what are my alternative career goals?
  • Do I want to gain research experience? Do I want an academic career in science?

Food for thought for ALL prospective post-bac students
Research these options carefully and as early as possible. Speak directly with the admissions counselors, alumni, and other program representatives to get a full picture of life in the programs and the options after completing them. You can find more information about these programs at:

AAMC - Association of American Medical Colleges website

Syracuse University has a great web site that they have adapted from the AAMC listing.

Pre-Health Career Services - Nursing

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

What is Nursing?

Nursing professionals provide preventative and restorative health care to patients in a variety of settings. Nurses work to promote health, prevent disease, and help patients cope with illnesses. Nursing is a science that requires in-depth knowledge, skills and understanding. Nursing deals not only with a person's biological needs, but their psychosocial and cultural needs as well.

Areas of Specialty

There are many areas open to nursing graduates, including the traditional hospital nurse who may work in pediatrics, maternity, the operating room, medical/surgical units, critical care, trauma, or the ER. Also found in hospitals are nursing educators, quality assurance nurses, nurse managers, nurse epidemiologists, and nursing supervisors. At the masters degree level the various specialties available to graduates include: nursing administration, certified nurse-midwifery, clinical specialist, nurse anesthetist, and nurse practitioner (most of the clinicians in our Women's Health Clinic in Student Health Services are nurse practitioners). Nurses holding doctoral degrees often take positions in research or academic settings.

Desired Skills

Nurses must be able to accept responsibility, direct or supervise others, follow orders precisely, and determine when consultation is necessary. As nurses are advocates for patients, families and communities, they should be caring and sympathetic.

Degree Options and Compensation

There are several levels of career choices including: the Licensed Vocational Nurse (L.V.N.), Registered Nurse (R.N.), and advance practice nurses who generally have a masters degree and/or a doctoral degree in nursing. The demand for nurses is overwhelming and the salaries are increasing accordingly. A bachelors degree in nursing (B.S.N.) is strongly recommended over the two year nursing program (L.V.N.). While both may lead to licensure as an R.N., a B.S.N. affords the opportunity to continue the nurse's education to the masters, Ph.D., or D.N.Sc (Doctor of Nursing Science) levels, whereas the L.V.N. is a terminal degree. Salaries for nurses with bachelors degrees range from around $28,500 to $41,000, varying greatly with geographical region. In administration, salaries range from $45,000 to $70,000. Generally, the more education a nurse has the greater pay and the greater number of options s/he will have.

Nursing Trends

Changes in health care trends, as well as an aging RN workforce—the average age is 44—are increasing the demand for more nurses in the workforce than ever before. These changes in health care trends are also making it even more important for nurses to be educated at the minimum level of baccalaureate degree. An article published by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in February 1998 addresses this importance with their statement, "Unlike associate-degree and diploma graduates who are prepared primarily for hospital and nursing home practice, BSN nurses have broad education in the physical and behavioral sciences, management concepts, and community health and have the flexibility to practice across a range of settings...critical thinking and leadership skills give BSN nurses an edge..."

Employment Outlook

Employment of registered nurses is expected to grow faster than average.

Related Occupations

Workers in other health care fields with responsibilities related to those of nursing include occupational therapists, emergency medical technicians, physical therapists, physician assistants, and respiratory therapists.

UCLA School of Nursing

The UCLA School of Nursing was established on the Los Angeles campus in 1949 and rapidly became a leading school of nursing in the U.S. Now the school enjoys a national and international reputation for excellence in teaching, research and clinical practice.

One of the strengths of the School of Nursing is its teaching of the scientific basis for nursing practice, leadership and research. Related clinical experiences are arranged within the UCLA Medical /Center, its affiliates, or in selected community sites. The school has Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Masters of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree programs.

There are two undergraduate degree program options: Nursing B.S. (Generic/Prelicensure) and Nursing B.S. (R.N. to B.S./Post licensure). The generic/pre licensure program, new for Fall Quarter 2006 with admission at the freshman level, is for students who wish to become registered nurses. The R.N. to B.S./post licensure program is for registered nurses from associate degree or diploma programs who wish to obtain their bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in three years.

The Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) degree program also offers pre licensure and post licensure options. The master’s entry clinical nurse (MECN)/pre licensure program, new for Fall Quarter 2006, is designed for students with a bachelor’s degree in another discipline who wish to become registered nurses. The advanced practice nurse (APN)/post licensure program is for registered nurses with a bachelor’s degree in nursing who wish to prepare for an advanced practice role, such as nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, or nurse administrator. Advanced practice specialties include acute care, family, gerontology, nursing administration, occupational and and environmental health, oncology and pediatrics.

The Ph.D. program prepares scholars who conduct original research, generate new theories and build the scientific basis for professional nursing practice. Our students conduct both basic and applied research. Moreover, our students learn first hand the value of translational research.

The UCLA School of Nursing has an exceptionally well qualified faculty, many of whom have earned national and international reputations for excellence. The school is consistently ranked high for its teaching and research programs. The innovative curriculum is responsive to national needs in healthcare and the diversity of the patient population. Graduates of the program are sought by healthcare institutions and educational programs and many alumni have become leaders in the field. Education in this research University with its full range of academic disciplines provides a rich environment for preparation in the health sciences. In addition, UCLA includes one of the top medical centers in the world, providing students with a cutting-edge learning environment.

For further  information, please visit:  www.nursing.ucla.edu

Application Timeline and Acceptance Information

Applications to schools of nursing are generally submitted one year prior to the fall you intend to enter. Competition for these programs is strong due to the fact that a majority of them are on impacted status.

Pre-Professional Nursing Preparation and Required Courses

Chemistry
Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D.
Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C*. *Chem 30CL may not be required for applicants from the life science majors.
Requirements vary per program. Biochemistry is recommended for all pre-health professions (i.e. Chemistry 153A/153L).

Microbiology
100L Microbio Lab for Professional Schools. One quarter with lab. MIMG 6 is the lower division microbiology class, but does not have a lab component. One course from a community college with lab may also be acceptable.

As of Summer 2011, for the first time, the UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology, & Molecular Genetics is offering MIMG 20, Pre-Nursing Medical Microbio. They continue to offer MIMG 6, but now MIMG 20 is the more appropriate class for students intending to apply to Nursing School. That is, unless the school to which you are applying requires an upper division Microbio class, in which case MIMG 101 is the best option. For questions, please contact Bridget Wolfgang, Student Affairs Officer, 310.825.8482, BridgetW@microbio.ucla.edu.

Human Anatomy
Phy Sci 13 or 107 (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). Phy Sci 13 through UCLA Extension is another good option.

Human Physiology
Phy Sci 3* or 5 or 111A-C (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). *PS 3 has a lab component effective Summer 04. Any offerings before Summer 04 did NOT have a lab. One course from a community college with lab may also be acceptable.

Anthropology
Any lower division introductory class (e.g. Anthro 7 or 9)

Psychology
Any lower division introductory class (e.g. Psych 10 or 15)

Sociology
Any lower division introductory class (e.g. Soc 1, 2, or 3)

Nutrition
Phy Sci 5 or 167 (upper division Phy Sci classes are generally restricted to Phy Sci majors). This can also be taken at any community college.

English

One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses.

Other Recommended Courses

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record, and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer.

UCLA is not responsible for coursework being accepted by recipient schools. Students should contact the individual schools directly.

Additional Information and Resources

How Can the UCLA Career Center Help?

The Career Center offers a wide range of workshops to assist you in preparing for graduate and professional school. Workshop topics range from Graduate School Planning to Resume Writing and Mock Interviewing. In addition, a number of special programs and panels related to the healthcare/nursing field are planned for Career Week to be held in January. A list of workshops and special programs can be found on the Career Center's website: career.ucla.edu.

Health Care Related Internships

Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis. A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, Cedar Sinai, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. Visit the Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services Office for a resource sheet handout providing an overview of health related internships. Please visit career.ucla.edu for more information.

Publications (Available in the Career Center Lab, UCLA Career Center)

Caring Careers: From Nursing Assistant to Professional Nurse, Greseth, Anabel & Judson, Karen (Glencoe Publishing Company)

Exploring Careers in Nursing, rev. ed., Heron, Jackie (Rosen Publishing Group)

Opportunities in Nursing Careers, Frederickson, Keville (VGM Career Horizons)

Peterson's Guide to Nursing Programs, 4th ed., Peterson's and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (Peterson's)

Program Information

Students can obtain more information and academic program lists by visiting the web site address for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing at www.aacn.nche.edu,or writing to the following address:

American Association of Colleges of Nursing
One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 350
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202.463.6930
Fax: 202.785.8320

General Information

National League for Nursing, www.nln.org, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006

American Nurses Association, www.nursingworld.org, 600 Maryland Ave. SW., Washington DC 20024-2571

NursingNet.Org www.nursingnet.org Includes information about mentoring programs including a Nursing Chatroom and Information Forum

NursingCenter.com www.nursingcenter.com - An interactive web community and portal created by nurses for nurses as a source of nursing information and content that is comprehensive, convenient, and current. It provides a forum to share ideas, access reference materials, advance their careers and education, order products and services, and read about the social, ethical and political topics affecting the nursing profession.

Pre-Professional Information

Student Nurse Forum kcsun3.tripod.com

Provides support and encouragement for those called to the diverse and rewarding field of nursing.

Pre-Health Career Services - Dentistry

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

What is Dentistry?

Dentistry is an occupation devoted to maintaining the health of the teeth, gums, and other hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity. In addition to individuals who provide direct care, the dental profession includes those who teach, conduct research and work in public and international health. Dentists diagnose, prevent, and treat teeth and tissue problems. They remove decay, fill cavities, examine x-rays, place protective plastic sealants on children's teeth, straighten teeth, and repair fractured teeth. They also perform corrective surgery on gums and supporting bones to treat gum diseases. Dentists extract teeth and make models and measurements for dentures to replace missing teeth. They provide instruction on diet, brushing, flossing, the use of fluorides, and other aspects of dental care, as well. They also administer anesthetics and write prescriptions for antibiotics and other medications. Dentists in private practice oversee a variety of administrative tasks, including bookkeeping, and buying equipment and supplies.

Areas of Specialty

The majority of dentists act as general practitioners, performing oral diagnosis, rehabilitation, restoring damaged or missing tooth structures, and providing preventive oral health care. In addition, there are nine dental specialties, which typically require one to four years of additional training beyond the dental degree and enumerate as follows.

Orthodontics is the science of tooth and oral structure development. As such, the orthodontist treats problems related to irregular and abnormal dental development.

Oral surgery is concerned with diseases, injuries, and defects in the jaw and associated structures.

Periodontics is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases that affect the oral mucous membranes, gum and bone that surround and support the teeth.

Pediatric dentistry or Pedodontics is concerned exclusively with the treatment of children, adolescents, and young adults whose dental development is not complete.

Endodontics deals with diseases of the pulp (nerve) and other dental tissues.

Prosthodontics is the science and art of replacing missing natural teeth with fixed or removable substitutes.

Oral pathology deals with the nature of diseases of the mouth, studying their causes, processes, and effects. As a diagnostician, the oral pathologist often provides counsel to other dentists rather than treating patients directly.

Dental public health is a form of dental practice that treats the community rather than the individual patient for the purpose of prevention and control of dental diseases.

Oral Radiology is the newest specialty recently recognized and in the development process by the ADA. While it has been recognized it may be many years before practitioners will announce specialist status.

Desired Skills

Dentistry requires diagnostic ability and manual skills. Dentists should have good visual memory, excellent judgment of space and shape, a high degree of manual dexterity, and scientific ability. Good business sense, self-discipline, and communication skills are helpful for success in private practice.

Degrees Offered

There are two degrees offered by the 57 U.S. Schools of Dentistry, D.M.D. (Doctor of Dental Medicine) degree or the more traditional D.D.S. (Doctor of Dental Surgery) degree. Both degrees are equivalent and require the same schooling, board exams, and licensure.

Employment Outlook

The character of dentistry is in the process of changing due to new research findings and the creation of new dental services. There is an expected increase in demand for dental service for an aging population, as well as in rural and inner-city areas with underserved populations. The profession is a rewarding one with the average income ranking in the upper five percent of family incomes in the United States.

Related Occupations

Dentists examine, diagnose, prevent, and treat diseases and abnormalities. Other similar careers for exploration are clinical psychologists, optometrists, physicians, chiropractors, veterinarians, and podiatrists.

Additional Information And Resources - How Can the UCLA Career Center Help?

Career Exploration

A combination of written information, experiential opportunities, testimonials or exposure to others and academic experience are helpful in exploring possible career opportunities. The Career Center affords various resources and services to assist students in this process including the Career Center Library, Workshops, Counseling, Assessments, and special programming. A career in dentistry requires manual dexterity, spatial, perceptual and scientific ability, and a desire to help and educate people. Make sure this is the career you desire and be prepared to take the necessary steps to reach your goals.

Health Care Related Interships

Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis. A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, Cedar Sinai, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. Visit the Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services Office for a resource sheet handout providing an overview of health related internships. Please visit career.ucla.edu for more information.

Mock Interview

Interview policies vary widely among schools: some require personal interviews; some give no interviews at all. Some dental schools may require chalk-carving tests during the interview. To assist with this process, the Career Center offers Interviewing workshops as well as an opportunity to receive a mock interview and feedback to help you prepare for your actual interviews.

Personal Statement

On the AADSAS application, a section is provided for students to write a personal statement/essay. It is limited to one page and must fit within the space allotted. For assistance with developing this statement, the career center has several books and will be coordinating workshops and content critiques with Academics in the Commons.

Letters of Recommendations

The Career Center offers UCLA students and alumni a service which stores and sends letters of recommendation to graduate schools. To open a PPS letter file, visit career.ucla.edu. All letters should be forwarded directly to the Career Center by the author, as these are confidential documents. Career Center will forward these to AADSAS upon written request.

Additional Resources Career Center LAB

BARRON'S GUIDE TO MEDICAL & DENTAL SCHOOLS, 10th ed. by Dr. Saul Wischnitzer & Edith Wischnitzer

DENTISTRY: A UNIQUE PROFESSION [video: 12 minutes] by the American Dental Association

GETTING INTO DENTAL SCHOOL: ASDA’S GUIDE FOR PREDENTAL STUDENTS by the American Student Dental Association

OFFICIAL GUIDE TO DENTAL SCHOOLS, 2005-2006, 43rd ed. American Dental Education Association

THE PRE-DENTAL GUIDE: A GUIDE FOR SUCCESSFULLY GETTING INTO DENTAL SCHOOL by Joseph S. Kim

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADIAN DENTAL SCHOOLS: 1999-2000, 36th ed. American Association of Dental Schools

BARRON'S GUIDE TO MEDICAL & DENTAL SCHOOLS, 8th ed. Dr. Saul Wischnitzer & Edith Wischnitzer

OPPORTUNITIES IN DENTAL CARE CAREERS Bonnie Kendall

REA'S AUTHORITATIVE GUIDE TO MEDICAL & DENTAL SCHOOLS [3rd ed.] Research and Education Association

WEB

American Dental Education Association www.adea.org
1625 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20036-2212
Phone: 202.667.9433

American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Accreditation, www.ada.org

ADA link for DAT http://www.ada.org/dat.aspx
211 E. Chicago Ave.
Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: 1.800.621.8099

American Association of Dental Schools www.aads.jhu.edu1625 Massachusetts Ave. NW.
Washington, DC 20036

Student Doctor www.studentdoctor.net

General Information: www.dental-resources.com

The UCLA Career Center is not responsible for the content of external Web site links. The appearance of a site on this list does not imply the endorsement of the site.

Pre-Dentistry Preparation

Many dental schools accept students after three or more years of undergraduate courses. The Council on Dental Education recommends a baccalaureate degree prior to dental school matriculation. When selecting students, schools consider scores earned on the DAT, the applicants' grade point average, and information gathered through recommendations and interviews. Students are encouraged to explore their interests and gain an understanding via exposure or experience in the field of dentistry.

Timeline

The application process begins one year prior to the year of desired admission. 50 of the 55 dental schools in the U.S. participate in the American Association of Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS). AADSAS applications can be obtained or completed on-line at www.adea.org each spring. AADSAS simplifies the application process for students by acting as an application clearinghouse. Applicants to participating dental schools complete only one application and AADSAS provides the individual schools with uniform, standardized information about the student. For dental schools that do not participate in AADSAS (Louisiana State University, Medical College of Georgia, Northwestern University, University of Mississippi, University of Tennessee), obtain the application material directly from the individual schools. There are five dental schools located in California: Loma Linda School of Dentistry, UCLA School of Dentistry, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry (UOP), UCSF School of Dentistry, and USC School of Dentistry, all of which are AADSAS participants.

Standardized Test

Dental schools use the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) as an instrument in the evaluation and comparison of dental school candidates. The test is designed to be taken after having taken most prerequisites and is recommended to be taken well before the time for application and interviewing - preferably the spring before the year you are expecting to matriculate. Although dental schools prefer that DAT scores be available when students apply for admission, you should not delay submission of your application simply because the DAT scores are not yet in. Students should strive to take the DAT no later then June of the year they apply.

This computerized test is designed to assess a student's (1) knowledge of the natural sciences (biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry); (2) reading comprehension skills in dental and the basic sciences; (3) quantitative reasoning; and (4) perceptual ability (angle-discrimination, form development, block counting, orthographic projections, and object visualization). The DAT is offered year-round at specific testing sites and results are available right away. The DAT is scored on a 1-30 scale. A DAT application is available in the UCLA Career Center or contact the American Dental Association, Telephone: 1.800.621.8099 or email: http://www.ada.org/dat.aspx. Application deadlines are approximately one month prior to the test. If you repeat the DAT, both scores will be reported to the dental schools.

Application Process

AADSAS makes downloadable application packets available in March and may be submitted beginning June 1; it is recommended that applications be submitted as early as possible. The application can be completed online and then mailed in with the requested information. AADSAS provides the service of verifying and forwarding transcripts and letters of recommendation to your chosen institutions. Most schools require that the applicant either utilize this service or immediately send official transcripts and letters of recommendation (LORs) directly to the school. In these cases, students should not wait until they receive a secondary application from the institution to mail the supplemental information. Refer to the AADSAS packet to determine when to send supplemental information to the schools. The Career Center will forward your letters of recommendation to AADSAS upon request.

Co-Curricular Activities

It is recommended that you engage in extracurricular activities. Pre-dental students should be able to demonstrate their potential for independent critical thought, leadership, concern for others, and an understanding of the dental profession.

Major & Required Courses

Dental schools seek to admit students from diverse educational backgrounds. All dental schools recognize the importance of a broad education which includes a strong foundation in Life and Physical Sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics) and a solid background in Social Sciences (political science, psychology, sociology, anthropology) and humanities (literature, history, philosophy). Although there is no preferred or required major for students who wish to attend dental school, there are specific courses necessary to meet the dental admission requirements. These required courses vary by school but typically include general chemistry, organic chemistry, biology and physics. They may also include biochemistry, anatomy, and physiology. Requirements for each of the schools may be found in Admission Requirements United States and Canadian Dental Schools (available for viewing at the UCLA Career Center Library or for purchase at any major bookstore) or via the individual school's admission material.

The following is a guideline of requirements and UCLA equivalents.

Pre-Professional Dentistry Preparation and Required Courses

Biology
Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L. 

Either series satisfies one year of Biology with lab requirement.
These courses will prepare you for the Natural Sciences section of the DAT.  Upper division course work in the life sciences is also recommended.

Chemistry
Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D and Biochemistry 153A/L or Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C/CL and Biochemistry 153A/L.
Physical Science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C/CL and Biochemistry 153A/L.
The general and organic chemistry coursework prepares you for the Natural Sciences section of the DAT.

Physics
Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.

English
One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses. These courses will prepare you for the Reading Comprehension section of the DAT.

Psychology
Psychology 10 (or the equivalent). One course in this area is sufficient, but more coursework is helpful.

Other strongly recommended courses:

Other Biology
Physiology, anatomy, embryology, histology, or cellular biology are all recommended. Check with each individual department counselor for availability of upper division courses.

Physiology Phy Sci 166, Phy Sci 3*, 5
Anatomy Phy Sci 13, NeuroSci M102
Embryology MCD Bio 138
Histology EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 157
Cellular Biology Any upper division Microbiology or MCD Bio class, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) M158
Microbiology MIMG 101/101L

*PS 3 has a lab component effective Summer 04. Any offerings before Summer 04 did NOT have a lab.

Math

Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes (PIC 10A, 10B, 10C). This is your preparation for calculus-based physics. These courses will prepare you for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the DAT.

Statistics
Statistics 10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*
*Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department. These courses will prepare you for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the DAT.

Foreign Language

Knowledge and cultural competency in any language other than English is a valuable asset to working in a health care field. If your future plans include working in California or the southwestern states, Spanish is highly valued and somewhat expected. Ask yourself: Can I walk into a hospital room and get a patient history in another language? If the answer is no, then consider taking college level foreign language classes to brush up on your skills.

 

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer. Check with individual schools about a computer purchase requirement.

UCLA is not responsible for coursework being accepted by recipient schools. Students should contact the individual schools directly.

Pre-Health Career Services - Medicine

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

There are several offices on campus ready to assist you in your journey towards a career in medicine. Please consult the UCLA Pre-Professional Services Referral Sheet available at the UCLA Career Center.

WHAT IS A PHYSICIAN?

Physicians diagnose illnesses and prescribe and administer treatment for people suffering from injury or disease using pharmacuetical drugs and surgery.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES

Physicians examine patients, obtain medical histories, and order, perform, and interpret diagnostic tests. They counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive health care.

DEGREES OFFERED

There are two types of physicians: The M.D. - Doctor of Medicine - and the D.O.- Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. M.D.s are also known as allopathic physicians. While M.D.s and D.O.s may use all accepted methods of treatment, including drugs and surgery, D.O.s place special emphasis on the body's musculoskeletal system, preventive medicine, and holistic patient care.

AREAS OF SPECIALTY

Most M.D.s and D.O.s are primary care physicians. They practice general and family medicine, general internal medicine, or general pediatrics and are usually the first health professional patients consult. When appropriate, primary care physicians refer to specialists, who are experts in medical fields such as obstetrics and gynecology, cardiology, psychiatry, or surgery. According to the American Medical Association, there are over 37 specialty areas ranging from medical, surgical, to other healthcare fields.

DESIRED SKILLS

People who wish to become physicians must have a desire to serve patients, be self-motivated, and be able to survive the pressures and long hours of medical education and practice. Physicians must also have a good bedside manner, emotional stability, and the ability to make decisions in emergencies. Prospective physicians must be willing to study throughout their career to keep up with medical advances. They will also need to be flexible to respond to the changing demands of a rapidly evolving health care system.

EDUCATION & TRAINING

Pre-medical students must complete specific undergraduate coursework (see the Pre-Medical School Academic Planning section). Also students volunteer at local hospitals and do research to gain experience in the health profession (see the Pre-Medical School Preparation section). It takes many years of education and training to become a physician: four years of undergraduate school, four years of medical school, and three to eight years of internship and residency, depending on the specialty selected. To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete one to seven years of graduate medical education. A final examination immediately after residency is necessary for board certification in specialty areas by the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS).

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK & EARNINGS

Employment of physicians will grow faster than average for all occupations throughout the year 2010 due to continued expansions of the health care industries. The growing and aging populations will drive overall growth in the demand for physician services. In addition, new technologies permit more intensive care: physicians can do more tests, perform more procedures, and treat conditions previously regarded as untreatable. According to the American Medical Association, median income, after expenses, for allopathic physicians was about $178,366. Earnings vary according to number of years in practice, geographic region, hours worked, and skills, personality, and professional reputation.

RELATED OCCUPATIONS

Physicians work to prevent, diagnose, and treat diseases, disorders, and injuries. Professionals in other occupations requiring similar skills and critical judgments include acupuncturists, audiologists, chiropractors, dentists, nurse practitioners, optometrists, physician assistants, podiatrists, speech pathologists, and veterinarians.

PRE-MEDICAL SCHOOL PREPARATION

Acceptance to medical school is very competitive. Applicants must submit transcripts, scores from the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular activities. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee.

TIMELINE

The medical school application process generally begins a year and a half before an applicant will attend Medical school. 

APPLICATION PROCESS

AMCAS The American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) is a non-profit, centralized application processing service for most U.S. Medical Schools. AMCAS does not render any admissions decisions and does not advise applicants where to submit applications. All students applying to AMCAS-participating schools must use the AMCAS service which is now available on line. www.aamc.org

Please note:

1)June of 2010 is when the AMCAS applications can be submitted. Applications should be submitted by mid-July, since secondary applications can arrive during late summer.

2) Transcripts may be sent to AMCAS after May 4th. Please note you may only send one set of transcripts from each institution you attended to AMCAS -- you cannot send updates.

3) Do not send letters of recommendation or resumes to AMCAS. Letters of recommendation are sent with secondary applications.

4) AMCAS has a fee waiver program that is based on income; the application is in the AMCAS packet and needs to be sent in early. (Note: Fee waiver applicants cannot submit their AMCAS application until their fee waiver has been approved; otherwise they will forfeit any waiver).

STANDARDIZED TEST - MCAT (Medical College Admissions Test)

The MCAT should be taken by May (or prior) of the year before graduation.

Four sections: Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, a Writing Sample, and Verbal Reasoning.

Financially disadvantaged applicants can apply for the MCAT Fee Reduction Program.

Most Medical Schools will only accept MCAT scores within two years of the exam.

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Clinical Experience is required for admission to all medical schools. This includes work in a doctor's office vocal clinic, or volunteer experience through the UCLA Medical Center or another major hospital. It makes no difference whether the student was paid or a volunteer. Medical school admission committees want to know that an applicant can work effectively in a health care environment. To volunteer at the UCLA Medical Center, visit their Office of Volunteer Services at 12-217 Center for Health Sciences (CHS), (310) 825-6001. Visit the web site at www.UCLAhealth.org (click on Volunteering).

Research is an effective way to demonstrate that a student can think critically and independently. Options include the Student Research Program (SRP), 199 courses, and Honors Theses projects. A student's level of responsibility is more important than whom the research was done for or the title of the position. Please refer to URC/Care programs document.

Student Research Program (SRP)

A research student will work on a faculty member's project under their supervision.

Requires less prior research experience than a 199.

college.ucla.edu/urc-care/srp.htm

199 (Independent Study) Courses

Students work on their own research project supervised by a faculty member.

Original research; requires more lab and science expertise than SRP.

HONORS THESES

A multi-part 199 honors series (usually three-quarters, 199) HA/HB/HC).

Satisfactory completion results in graduating with departmental honors.

(Contact your academic department for detailed, specific requirements).

Other research options:

Volunteer - Informally approach a faculty member you are acquainted with and ask to do research.

Lab Worker - These jobs (and work study positions), though involving introductory lab work, can develop into research positions.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR FINDING INDEPENDENT RESEARCH POSITIONS

Pre-medical students may wish to contact faculty to inquire about his/her willingness to take on an undergraduate researcher. Some may be open and other will not be interested or available as they are involved with supervising graduate students engaged in research.

Access ( Programs in the Molecular, Cellular, and Integration Life Sciences ) Site

This site does not include direct referrals for research positions, but rather can be used as a means of identifying faculty who are engaged in working within various research areas.

1) Visit the web site: www.uclaaccess.ucla.edu
2) From the List of Sidebar Categories, select “Our Faculty”
3) Click on AFFINITY GROUP (you will find this after the alphabetical block of text)
4) You will see a scroll down menu with research fields (Example: Virology and Gene Therapy)
5) Students should Click on the Research Field of Interest and a profile on each faculty 
member and their research will appear including contact information. 
6) Be sure to do thorough research on the field before contacting a faculty member and have 
a letter of interest critiqued in drop in counseling by the UCLA Career Center.

MAJOR

Any major is appropriate for medical school preparation. Since the medical school requirements can be taken with any UCLA major, a student should choose a major based on personal preference. Medical schools prefer students with a diversity of experiences that have demonstrated a strong commitment to learning.

The following is a list of Majors Represented: UCLA Matriculants to Medical Schools (Entering Class 2007)

Anthropology
Biochemical Engineering
Biochemistry
Biology
Business Economics
Chemical Engineering
Classics
Communications
Computer Science
Economics
Electrical Engineering
English
History
Microbiology
Molecular Biology
Music
Neuroscience
Other
Philosophy
Physiology
Political Science
Psychobiology
Psychology
Religion
Sociology

REQUIRED COURSES FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL

Medical schools require a standardized list of courses, which are listed on the Pre-Medical School Academic Planning section of this document.

UCLA coursework is accepted by agreement with the various medical schools; courses titles (and units) may vary from requirements listed in the Medical School Admissions Requirements (MSAR)1.

Topics required for medical school preparation include molecular biology, genetics, organic chemistry, biochemistry, general physics, college level English, and a broad range of humanities and social science courses (see Pre-Medical School - Academic Planning).

PRE-MEDICAL SCHOOL - ACADEMIC PLANNING

DISCLAIMER: The following are our conservative interpretations of the requirements of various U.S. medical schools. Because each individual medical school determines its own requirements, as well as how they enforce said requirements, every U.S. medical school will not necessarily require all of these courses. Our guidelines are based on the requirements of several of the most demanding medical programs, which often are adopted by other schools.

Since specific undergraduate course requirements for U.S. medical schools vary, students should also consult Medical School Admission Requirements, an annual publication of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and/or individual schools. All medical schools, though, consider a broad education in the life sciences (Biology and Chemistry), physics, mathematics, writing and communication skills, and the social sciences and humanities.

Pre-Professional Allopathic Physician Preparation and Required Classes

Biology

Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L. 
Either series satisfies one year of Biology with lab requirement.
Upper division course work in the life sciences is also recommended, especially for students in the non-science majors.


Chemistry

Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D; plus 153A/L (biochemistry).

Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C*; plus 153A/L (biochemistry). *Chem 30CL may not be required for applicants from the life science majors.


General and organic chemistry courses are required. Many schools include a separate requirement for or a strong recommendation to take biochemistry. The general chemistry coursework will prepare you for the Physical Science section, and the organic chemistry coursework prepares you for the Biological Science section of the MCAT.

Physics
Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.


 

Math
Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A
This is your preparation for calculus-based physics. Several schools require one year of college level math. For other schools, this requirement is strongly recommended, especially as preparation for physics. One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes
(PIC 10A, 10B, 10C).

 

Statistics
Statistics 10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*
One quarter of statistics is required for some schools including UCLA and strongly recommended for others. *Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department.

 

English
One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses. These courses will prepare you for the Verbal Reasoning and Writing Sample sections of the MCAT.

 

Foreign Language
Knowledge and cultural competency in any language other than English is a valuable asset to working in a health care field. If your future plans include working in California or the southwestern states, Spanish is highly valued and somewhat expected. Ask yourself: Can I walk into a hospital room and get a patient history in another language? If the answer is no, then consider taking college level foreign language classes to brush up on your skills.

 

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

 

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer. Other programs have indicated that they will soon have the purchase of a computer as part of the requirements of their program.

 

UCLA is not responsible for coursework being accepted by recipient schools. Students should contact the individual schools directly.

 

Before you take the MCAT

At the very minimum you should have completed Biology through Life Science 4, Chemistry through 14D or 30C, and Physics through 6C or 1C. Upper division course work in the life sciences, such as in Physiology or Histology, will help you on the MCAT.

 

Rationale behind the medical school requirements
Principles and the scientific vocabulary basic to medicine must be understood by entering medical students. A thorough understanding of modern concepts in biology, chemistry, and physics is necessary since the study and practice of medicine is based on these disciplines. Candidates for medical school must study in these areas in order to (1) confirm their interest and capacity for proceeding further in these fields, (2) enable medical schools to estimate their achievement and potential in these areas, and (3) meet the requirements of state laws governing physician licenser.

 

Refined communication skills - the use and understanding of written and spoken language - are essential both for the study of medical disciplines and for communication with patients. Effective communication is the foundation of a physician's successful relationship with patients, the public and with other professionals.

 

Students planning a career in medicine are also advised to study the humanities and the social and behavioral sciences. These disciplines form the core of what is known about the macroscopic human existence - history, achievements, ideals, and ambitions. Moreover, they are complementary to the study of molecular aspects of human development and can help one achieve an understanding of self and of others. Attitudes, values and motivation are important determinants of behavior in sickness as well as in health.

 

Undergraduate Major
The selection of an undergraduate major area of study should be a careful and considered decision. Students should select a major that is of interest and that will provide a foundation of knowledge necessary for several different career alternatives. Students who select a major solely or primarily because of the perception that it will enhance the chance of acceptance to a school of medicine are not making a decision in their best interest.

 

Our office strongly emphasizes that a science major is not a prerequisite for medical school. Students should not major in science simply because they believe this will increase their chances for acceptance. Medical schools are most concerned with the overall quality and scope of undergraduate work. The schools also recognize the desirability of including students with a broad variety of backgrounds in medical school classes. It is true that non-science majors who take as electives a minimum number of science courses to meet medical school requirements must do well in these courses to ensure adequate preparation and favorable consideration by admission committees. For most physicians, however, the undergraduate years are the last available opportunity to pursue in depth a non-science subject of interest, and all who hope to practice medicine should bear this in mind when selecting an undergraduate major.1

Treatment of AP units
Students entering UCLA with AP units for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or English are still required to fulfill the prerequisites for medical school listed on the opposite side. Most medical schools do not exempt students from completing the prerequisite courses that are covered by AP units.

 

Important Points to Remember
Students should check prerequisites for courses and note which quarter these courses are offered. This handout lists recommended requirements for medical school admission. Requirements for UCLA departmental majors may be more stringent. The P/NP grade option is not recommended. It is a strategic advantage to take the MCAT no later than the spring prior to the year in which the applicant plans to enter medical school.

 

1Paraphrased from Medical School Admission Requirements.

 

HOW CAN THE CAREER CENTER HELP YOU?
CAREER EXPLORATION
A combination of written information, experiential opportunities, testimonials or exposure to others and academic experience are helpful in exploring possible career opportunities. The career center affords various resources and services to assist students in this process including the Career Center Library, Workshops, Counseling, assessments, and special programming. A career in medicine requires dedication, time commitment, and a lengthy educational process. Make sure this is the career that you desire and if not visit the career center to explore other health care options. Take the steps necessary to attain your goal.

 

HEALTH CARE RELATED INTERNSHIPS
Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement.

 

INTERNSHIPS
Internship & International Opportunities
Serving UCLA students for 40 years, since 1965.
http://career.ucla.edu/Students/InternshipInternationalOpportunities/Overview.aspx
The UCLA Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services office was established to help UCLA students expand their horizons. For 40 years, this office has been committed to the personal and professional growth and development of UCLA students through local, state, national and interntional programs. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis.

 

National Health Care Internships
- Full time, Ten Weeks
- Fall, Spring, Winter and Summer
- Quarters in Washington, D.C.
- Summer in Sacramento
- Scholarships, Stipends, Loans and College Credit Available

 


A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. The National Internship Director conducts info sessions each quarter. Please review the workshop schedule for dates and times.

 

 

 

 

 

Local Health Care Internships

There are many Los Angeles and Bay Area health related internships with organizations including (but not limited to) the Los

Angeles Free Clinic, Los Angeles County Health Care Network, Phizer, Cedars Sinai Hospital, among others.The Local Counselor conducts info sessions each quarter. Review the workshop schedulefor dates and times.

 

 

International Health Care Internships
A sampling of international health care internships include (but are not limited to) Amigos de las Americas (Latin America), Cross Cultural Solutions and Child Family Health International (Bolivia, Ecuador, India, Mexico, and South America). 

 

MOCK INTERVIEW
After reviewing your materials, most schools grant interviews prior to making final decisions regarding admissions. The Career Center offers interviewing workshops as well as an opportunity to receive a mock interview and feedback prior to your actual interview. Visit the Career Center's web site for a list of Pre-Med Mock Interview days at Bruinview. In addition, the web site Student Doctor (www.studentdoctor.net) has a Medical School Interview Feedback Section.

 

PERSONAL STATEMENT
On the AMCAS application, a section is provided for students to write personal comments in relation to specific outlined questions (i.e. academic actions) and/or a personal statement. This is an opportunity to briefly explain your goals and motivation for applying to the field of Medicine. The length of the statement must fit within the space allotted. For assistance with developing this statement, the career center has several books and has coordinated workshops and content critiques with Academics in the Commons. Many institutions request for an expanded version as part of their supplementary package which may be available on their website.

 

In addition, the Career Center conducts 30-minute Personal Statement Critique sessions on a quarterly basis.

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
All institutions request letters of recommendation or evaluation, usually three to five letters at the time of the supplementary or secondary application. Guidelines for authors of letters of recommendation, however, vary among the institutions. Some require or recommend a combination of letters from professors, practicing M.D.s, advisors, employers, clergy person, etc. It is highly recommended that you identify at least a minimum of two science professors. Also we recommend that you review the guidelines of your institutions of choice to ensure that you are meeting their requirements.

 

Many institutions ask for a pre-health advisor or committee letter. Since we do not have committees at UCLA for a collective letter, you should follow the guidelines for alternative letters of evaluation, which typically would be professors or others familiar with your academic performance or scholarship. The Career Center offers UCLA students and alumni a service which stores and sends letters of recommendation to graduate schools. To open a PPS letter file, visit career.ucla.edu. All letters should be forwarded directly to the Career Center by the author, as these are confidential documents.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:2
Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR): published annually by AAMC. Sold at major bookstores.

 

·AAMC.org (the American Association of Medical Colleges Web site). Offers a wealth of information about the medical school application process, specialized programs, MCAT registration information, and links.

 

Studentdoctor.net. Web site offering extensive information for prospective health sciences students.

 

1Published annually by the American Association of Medical Colleges (Washington, D.C.). It is available for viewing at the PPS and for purchase at major bookstores (such as Amazon.com).

 

2 The Pre-Professional Advising office is not responsible for the content of external Web site links.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION & RESOURCES
The UCLA Career Center is not responsible for the content of external Web site links. The appearance of a site on this list does not imply the endorsement of the site.

 

APPLICATION SERVICES
American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS)

The American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS™) is a non-profit, centralized application processing service for applicants to the first-year entering classes at participating U.S. medical schools. For the 2006 entering class, 124 medical schools are participating in AMCAS. Applicants to medical schools that do not participate in AMCAS, as well as all advanced standing and transfer applicants, should contact schools directly for application instructions. For a list of participating schools, visit Medical Schools Participating in AMCAS for the 2011 Entering Class.

 

For more information on AMCAS look at their website:
www.aamc.org/students/amcas/start.htm

 

AMCAS email: amcas@aamc.org

Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)

Section for Student Services 2501 M Street, NW, Lobby-26 Washington, DC 20037-1300

 

AMCAS web application


AMCAS service is now available on line:

http://www.aamc.org/audienceamcas.htm

 

CAREER INFORMATION
For general information on physicians, contact:

The American Medical Association (AMA)
Department of Communications and Public Relations
515 N. State St., Chicago, IL 60610
Internet: www.ama-assn.org

 

EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION
For a list of allopathic medical schools and residency programs, as well as general information on premedical education, financial aid, medicine as a career, contact:

Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)
Section for Student Services
2450 N. Street N.W.
Washington, DC 20037-1131
Internet: www.aamc.org

 

FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION
Financing Your Medical Education

This site contains a comprehensive list of Scholarship and Loan programs to finance medical school. www.aamc.org/students/financing/start.htm

 

State Loan Repayment Programs
State and Other Loan Repayment/Forgiveness and Scholarship Programs is a database that compiles U.S. programs that offer financial assistance, in the form of loan repayments, for a commitment to service (generally in an area of need). State health departments and other agencies, medical and health professions schools, federal programs, and military agencies provided the information.

 

POSTBAC PREHEALTH PROGRAMS

AAMC Post Bac Programs List

A comprehensive list of Post Bac programs offered nationwide.

services.aamc.org/postbac

 

Post Bac Programs by Type:

UCLA CAREER CENTER SPONSORED PRE-HEALTH STUDENT GROUPS

American Medical Student Association - www.amsa.org

AMSA is a student-governed, national organization committed to representing the concerns of physicians-in-training. With a membership of over 30,000 medical students, pre-medical sudents, interns and residents from across the country, AMSA continues its commitment to improving medical training and the nation's health. Web site includes current health issues, AMSA listserve, AMSA newsletter, on-line newsroom, calendar of events, and deadlines. Visit our web site for profiles of other groups sponsored by the Career Center.

Additional Student Associations

Career M.D.

www.careermd.com

Targeted for medical students, it has databases to find residency programs, fellowships and open positions. Also provides updated current health related issues through community forums and career insight articles.

Student Doctor

www.Studentdoctor.net

This web site offers extensive information for prospective health sciences students.

Tests

MCAT Information from the AAMC

Official MCAT website with registration, practice tests, scores, research, FAQ, and contact information.www.aamc.org/students/mcat/start.htmThis is the official source for MCAT information and preparatory materials from AAMC. Products include the MCAT Student Manual and a series of five full-length MCAT Practice Tests comprised of actual MCAT items.

MEDICAL SCHOOL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS (MSAR)

Published annually by AAMC. Call 202.828.0416 for information on ordering. It is also sold at major bookstores. This annual publication, updated each spring, describes U.S., Canadian, and Puerto Rican medical schools, detailing entrance requirements of each school, selection factors, curriculum features, current first year expenses, financial aid information, application and acceptance procedures, and applicant statistics.

Occupational Outlook Handbook

Vocational Biographies

Pre-Health Career Services - Optometry

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

WHAT IS OPTOMETRY?

Optometry combines the biological and physical sciences into a clinical discipline that diagnoses and corrects a wide range of vision difficulties. Doctors of Optometry (O.D.'s) provide treatment by prescribing ophthalmic lenses or other optical aids, providing vision therapy to preserve or restore maximum efficiency in vision, and in some states, are authorized to prescribe drugs in the treatment of certain eye diseases. O.D.'s can also detect general diseases of the human body that have the potential capacity to affect vision, such as diabetes, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis. Practicing optometry offers opportunities to work as independent practitioners, as part of a group practice in a health clinic or hospital, or in government or military service. Most optometrists today are self-employed and have very flexible working hours. Career opportunities within optometry include optometric education, research, and health care administration. Specialties consist of pediatrics, low-vision services for visually impaired patients, contact lenses, sports vision, vision therapy, geriatrics, and occupational vision.

DESIRED SKILLS

Business ability, self-discipline, and the ability to deal tactfully with patients are important for success. The work of optometrists requires attention to detail and good manual dexterity.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Programs leading towards the Doctor of Optometry consist of four years of specialized professional education and clinical training. Some programs accept applicants who have completed a minimum of three years of undergraduate study; however most programs prefer or will require completion of an undergraduate degree prior to matriculation. Students need to obtain application materials from the individual schools, take the OAT and apply to schools one year prior to entering a School of Optometry. There is variance between schools regarding the earliest time to apply, but it is best to apply as early as possible. Some schools begin accepting applications in August, while other schools do not begin accepting applications until October. Most schools accept applications until February or March of the year that you plan to enter. Optometry programs consider many factors and criteria for admissions including academic competitiveness (GPA, OAT scores, and undergraduate degrees) and professional potential (biographic information, knowledge of the profession, and letters of reference). Most, but not all, schools interview applicants as part of the process. Applicants are also advised to get a copy of "Optometry: A Career With Vision," which gives descriptions and comparisons of individual school programs, entering class profiles, costs, etc. You may obtain this booklet, at no cost, by writing the American Optometric Association, 243 N. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63141, 314.991.4100, www.aaopt.org

.

MAJOR & CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Students can major in almost any discipline provided the required courses are completed in order to be competitive when applying to schools of optometry. In addition to academics, extracurricular activities are strongly recommended. We also strongly suggest working with an optometrist to get experience within the field. Research projects with faculty members are also recommended. The Student Research Program (SRP), located at 2121 Life Sciences, is a good way to find professors who are willing to do research with undergraduates.

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK

The need for optometrists is expanding as career and job opportunities increase in the service and information technology fields where the need for good visual functioning is high. The aging population in the U.S. creates an additional increase in demand for O.D.'s that will last well into the next several decades. Based on data from USA Today, optometry is one of the top ten income-earning professions in the country and is the third largest healthcare industry. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, employment growth will be fastest in retail optical stores and outpatient clinics.

RELATED OCCUPATIONS

Workers in other occupations who apply scientific knowledge to prevent, diagnose, and treat disorders and injuries are chiropractors, dentists, physicians, podiatrists, veterinarians, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

HOW CAN THE UCLA CAREER CENTER HELP YOU?

CAREER EXPLORATION

A combination of written information, experiential opportunities, testimonials or exposure to others and academic experience are helpful in exploring possible career opportunities. The career center affords various resources and services to assist students in this process including the Career Center Library, Workshops, Counseling, assessments, and special programming. A career in Optometry requires manual dexterity, attention to detail and excellent interpersonal skills. Make sure this is the career you desire and you are prepared to take the steps necessary to attain your goals.

 

HEALTH CARE RELATED INTERNSHIPS
Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis. A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, Cedar Sinai, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. Visit the Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services Office for a resource sheet handout providing an overview of health related internships. Please visit career.ucla.edu for more information.

 

MOCK INTERVIEW
After reviewing your materials, most schools grant interviews prior to making final decisions regarding admissions. The Career Center offers Interviewing workshops as well as an opportunity to receive a mock interview and feedback prior to your actual interviews.

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
The Career Center offers UCLA students and alumni a service which stores and sends letters of recommendation to graduate schools. To open a PPS letter file, visit career.ucla.edu. All letters should be forwarded directly to the Career Center by the author, as these are confidential documents.

 


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

LIBRARY
Schools and Colleges of Optometry: Admission Requirements

 

WEB
For information on optometry as a career and a listing of accredited optometric educational institutions, as well as required pre-optometry courses, contact:

 

American Optometric Association, Educational Services, 243 North Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63141-7881. www.aoanet.org

 

Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, 6110 Executive Blvd., Suite 510, Rockville, MD 20852. www.opted.org


American Optometric Student Association www.theosa.org


The American Academy of Optometry www.aaopt.org


PRE-OPTOMETRY PREPARATION

 

TIMELINE

There are 16 Schools of Optometry in the United States, two in Canada, and one in Puerto Rico. Each of these schools requires a combination of specific coursework, OAT scores, applications, and letters of recommendation. The timeline for the application process begins over a year prior to the academic year you are applying for.

 

STANDARDIZED TESTS

All schools require the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), which tests academic ability and scientific comprehension. The test is offered in February and October of each year. We recommend taking the February exam in order to have an early application. The OAT consists of four sub-tests: Quantitative Reasoning, Survey of the Natural Sciences (Bio, General Chem, Organic Chem), Reading Comprehension, and Physics. Applications for the OAT can be found at the UCLA Career Center or call: 312.440.2693.

 

REQUIRED COURSES 
This is NOT a comprehensive or required list of prerequisites for all optometry programs. Students maintain responsibility for verifying course selection with individual optometry programs. Be sure to check the catalogs of potential schools or the Admissions Requirements for Schools and Colleges of Optometry.

PREPARATION COURSEWORK 

•Biology Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L. 
Either series represents one year of Biology with lab. These courses prepare you for the Natural Science section of the OAT.

Human Anatomy
Phy Sci 13 or 107 (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). Phy Sci 13 through UCLA Extension is another good option.

Human Physiology
*Phy Sci 166 or **Phy Sci 3 or 111A-C (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). *Phy Sci 166 may not be acceptable for some schools, please check with the individual schools. **PS 3 does not have a lab component.

Microbiology
MIMG 101/103L or 100L. One quarter with lab. One course from a community college with lab may also be acceptable.

Chemistry
Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D. Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C. These courses prepare you for the Natural Sciences section of the OAT.

Biochemistry
Chemistry 153A/153L
Physics
Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.• Psychology Psych 10 plus 1 upper division class (e.g. Psych 127).

Math
Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A. This is your preparation for calculus-based physics. One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes (PIC 10A, 10B, 10C). These courses prepare you for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the OAT.

Statistics
Statistics 10, 13, Biostatistics 100A or Biomath, Psychology 100A (Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department). These courses prepare you for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the OAT.

English
One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses. These courses will prepare you for the Verbal Reasoning and Writing Sample sections of the MCAT.

 

Other recommended courses

 

Other Biology


Physiology, anatomy, embryology, histology, or cellular biology are all recommended. Check with each individual department counselor for availability of upper division courses.



Embryology - MCD Bio 138
Histology- EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 157
Cellular Biology - Any upper division Microbiology or MCD Bio class, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) M158

 

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

 

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer.

 

UCLA is not responsible for coursework being accepted by recipient schools. Students should contact the individual schools directly.

 


Pre-Health Career Services - Osteopathic

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

PRE-OSTEOPATHIC PREPARATION

In preparation for Osteopathic medicine, most schools require a combination of specific coursework, MCAT scores and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular and/or community activities. Schools of Osteopathy also recommend exposure, understanding and interest in Osteopathic Medicine and excellent interpersonal and communication skills. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee.

TIMELINE

Beyond required coursework and MCAT preparation, the timeline for the application process begins at minimum 14-15 months prior to expected matriculation. For example, the process would begin April 2008 for 2009-2010 admission. The application cycle begins June 1. Some schools offer "Early Decision" programs. The majority of schools operate on a rolling admissions basis, so classes may be filled before the listed deadline dates. By applying early there is greater probability that your materials will be processed in a timely manner.

STANDARDIZED TEST

The majority of schools require competitive Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) scores. MCAT is offered in April and August of each year. It is recommended that students take the MCAT in April of their Junior year. Therefore allowing August for possibility of retaking the test if your scores are not what you desire. MCAT scores must be released to AACOMAS (code 600) as part of the application process.

APPLICATION PROCESS

AACOMAS, American Association of Colleges of Osteopath Medicine Application Service, is a centralized process, which verifies your information and submits it to institutions of your choice. This service is utilized by 27 of the osteopath institutions. (University of North Texas Health Science Center uses the Texas Medical and Dental Schools Application Service - see dpweb1.dp.utexas.edu/mdac/homepage.htm for details).

Students initiate the application process by submitting official transcripts and MCAT scores directly to AACOMAS. If a fee waiver is desired, this also must be submitted prior to the application. Thereafter, students submit the AACOMAS application (available both online and in paper format), College Designation Form, Professional School Academic Record (if applicable), and application processing fee starting June 1. AACOMAS normally processes applications in four to six weeks. Upon verification, AACOMAS will forward an Applicant Profile to you and submit your application materials to your designated institutions.

Most institutions forward supplementary or secondary applications to students meeting the minimum GPA and MCAT requirements after receiving the application materials from AACOMAS. The application may include essays, non-academic information and evaluation forms. Some institutions request a statement of purpose in seeking a medical career as part of this application. Applicants are instructed to complete the secondary application (many schools have it available online) and provide letters of recommendation with an application fee which typically range from $25-$75.

All institutions request letters of recommendation or evaluation; usually three-five letters at the time of the supplementary or secondary application. Guidelines for authors of letters of recommendation, however, vary among the institutions. Some require/recommend a combination of letters from professors, a practicing D.O., advisors, employers, a clergy person, etc. It is highly recommended you identify at least a minimum of two science professors. Also, we recommend you review the guidelines of your institutions of choice to ensure you are meeting their requirements.

Various institutions ask for a pre-health advisor or committee letter. Since we do not have committees at UCLA for a collective letter, you should follow the guidelines for alternative letters of evaluation, which typically would be professors or others familiar with your academic performance or scholarship. All letters should be directly sent to UCLA Career Center by the author. Upon request, they will be forwarded to institutions of your choice.

 

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Colleges consider both cognitive and non-cognitive factors in the admissions process. In addition to academic excellence, job history, extracurricular and/or community activities, letters of evaluation, and interviews are used to attest to the rest. Most admission committees seek students that demonstrate a genuine concern and interest for people, a sincere understanding of and interest in the process and philosophy of Osteopathic Medicine, and a general awareness of the medical profession as demonstrated by various medically related or human service experiences. Other factors include leadership skills, motivation, maturity, effective listening and communication skills, and character and personality. Clinical experience, research, student group or community activities are excellent ways to demonstrate these qualities.

Any major is appropriate for medical school preparation since the pre-med. requirements can be taken in conjunction with any major UCLA offers. However, it is best to choose your major based on your personal preferences because grade point average (GPA) is an important factor considered by medical schools. According to colleges of osteopathy, most prospective D.O. students major in sciences with an emphasis in biology or chemistry.

REQUIRED COURSES

To be considered for admission to any of the nation's osteopathic medical schools, applicants typically have completed undergraduate studies that include English, biological sciences, physics, general chemistry, and organic chemistry.

Other requirements may include genetics, biochemistry, mathematics, and courses in behavioral sciences. Check with the individual schools of interest for specific course requirements. Some schools accept students who have completed 75% of their undergraduate studies, however, the majority prefer completion of a baccalaureate degree prior to enrollment.

Pre-Professional Osteopathic Physician and Required Courses

The following is a guideline of core requirements and UCLA equivalents.

Biology

Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L. 
Either series satisfies one year of Biology with lab requirement.
Upper division course work in the life sciences is also recommended.

Chemistry


Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D; plus 153A/L (biochemistry).

Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C*; plus 153A/L (biochemistry). *Chem 30CL may not be required for applicants from the life science majors.


General and organic chemistry courses are required. Many schools include a separate requirement for or a strong recommendation to take biochemistry. The general chemistry coursework will prepare you for the Physical Science section, and the organic chemistry coursework prepares you for the Biological Science section of the MCAT.

 

Physics
Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses. 

English

One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses. These courses will prepare you for the Verbal Reasoning and Writing Sample sections of the MCAT.

 

Behavioral Science
One year of behavioral science. Coursework generally includes Psychology, Sociology, Gerontology, and Cultural Anthropology. Check with each individual department counselor for availability of upper division courses.


Other strongly recommended courses:

Other Biology
Physiology, anatomy, embryology, histology, or cellular biology are all recommended. Check with each individual department counselor for availability of upper division courses.

Physiology

Phy Sci 166, Phy Sci 3*, 5, 111A-C

Anatomy

Phy Sci 13, 107, NeuroSci M102

Embryology

MCD Bio 138

Histology

EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) 157

Cellular Biology

Any upper division Microbiology or MCD Bio class, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) M158

*PS 3 has a lab component effective Summer 04. Any offerings before Summer 04 did NOT have a lab.

Math
Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A

One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes (PIC 10A, 10B, 10C). This is your preparation for calculus-based physics.

Statistics

Statistics 10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*

*Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department.

Foreign Language

Knowledge and cultural competency in any language other than English is a valuable asset to working in a health care field. If your future plans include working in California or the southwestern states, Spanish is highly valued and somewhat expected. Ask yourself: Can I walk into a hospital room and get a patient history in another language? If the answer is no, then consider taking college level foreign language classes to brush up on your skills.

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer. Check with individual schools about a computer purchase requirement.

UCLA is not responsible for coursework being accepted by recipient schools. Students should contact the individual schools directly.


 

HOW CAN THE CAREER CENTER HELP YOU?

 

CAREER EXPLORATION

A combination of written information, experiential opportunities, testimonials or exposure to others and academic experience are helpful in exploring possible career opportunities. The career center affords various resources and services to assist students in this process including the Career Center Library, Workshops, Counseling, assessments, and special programming. A career in medicine requires dedication, time commitment and a lengthy educational process. Make sure this is the career you desire and take the steps necessary to attain your goals.

 

HEALTH CARE RELATED INTERNSHIPS

Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis. A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, Cedar Sinai, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. Visit the Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services Office for a resource sheet handout providing an overview of health related internships. Please visit career.ucla.edu for more information.

 

MOCK INTERVIEW

After reviewing your materials, most schools grant interviews prior to making final decisions regarding admissions. The Career Center offers Interviewing workshops as well as an opportunity to receive a mock interview and feedback prior to your actual interviews.

 

PERSONAL STATEMENT

On the AACOMAS application, a section is provided for students to write personal comments in relation to specific outlined questions (ex. academic actions, misdemeanor/felony; D.O. relatives) and/or a personal statement. This is an opportunity to briefly explain your goals and motivation for applying to the field of Osteopathic Medicine. The length of the statement must fit within the space allotted - approximately a half page. For assistance with developing this statement, the career center has several books and will be coordinating workshops and content critiques with Academics in the Commons. Many institutions request an expanded version as part of their supplementary package which may be available for your perusal on their website.

 

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

The Career Center offers UCLA students and alumni a service which stores and sends letters of recommendation to graduate schools. To open a PPS letter file, visit career.ucla.edu. All letters should be forwarded directly to the Career Center by the author, as these are confidential documents. Do not send letters to AACOMAS for processing, as they will not be forwarded to the institutions.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

LIBRARY

The library contains a myriad of information to explore and learn more about Osteopathic Medicine, the application process, and related careers. A sample of resources include:

Careers In Medicine: Traditional And Alternative Opportunities, T. Donald Rucker, Ph.D. & Martin D. Keller Garrett Park Press

Horizons Unlimited: A Handbook Describing Rewarding Career Opportunities In Medicine And Allied Fields, 9th ed. American Medical Association American Medical Association

Vocational Biographies


Occupational Outlook Handbook



WEB
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine www.aacom.org

American Osteopathic Association www.aoa-net.org

Osteopathic Physicians & Surgeons of California www.opsc.org

Osteopaths Online www.osteopathonline.com

Student Doctor www.studentdoctor.com

Pre-Health Career Services - Pharmacy

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

WHAT IS PHARMACY?

Pharmacists are health professionals who are concerned with the pharmaceutical needs of patients. In the past, pharmacists were known as the professionals whose primary function is to compound and dispense medicines prescribed by physicians, dentists, or other authorized health care providers. In recent years, however, the responsibilities of pharmacists have broadened substantially, primarily in the areas of consultation with physicians, direct patient care and patient education. The majority of registered pharmacists work in a variety of settings. Most visible are different types of community pharmacies which range from independent, strictly prescription pharmacies, such as those found in medical office buildings, to chain pharmacies that generate income from the sale of other merchandise (e.g. food, drug and discount stores). Pharmacists are also employed in hospitals, home health care, nursing homes, other health care facilities, or health maintenance organizations. Opportunities for pharmacists that expand beyond direct patient care are found in research or manufacturing organizations, colleges or universities, and various departments in the government.

AREAS OF SPECIALITY

Specialization opportunities are becoming increasingly available for pharmacists to work as clinical pharmacists. Such recognized pharmacy practitioner specialties are ambulatory care, clinical phamacokinetics, geriatrics, oncology, psychopharmacology, drug information, and nutrition support. Pharmacists have also been instrumental in establishing many of the poison information and control centers around the country.

DESIRED SKILLS

As pharmacists become more involved in educating patients about their prescribed medications, including possible drug interactions and side effects, communication and interpersonal skills and a desire to help others are vital. Other skills integral to a successful pharmacy career include critical thinking skills, good judgement and dependability, attention to detail, consultation skills, and knowledge of business management. Due to the nature of the position, pharmacists are required to be on their feet for long periods of time, particularly in community pharmacies.

DEGREES OFFERED

Currently, there are 103 fully accredited pharmacy programs in the United States. Pharmacy programs award two professional degrees: The Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (BS Pharm.) and the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm D.) The Bachelor's degree requires five years of collegiate study, whereas the Pharm. D. is a four year program following a minimum of two years of pre-pharmacy coursework in college. Approximately 75% of students admitted to Pharm. D. programs have completed four or more years of university work. Only three programs in the US offer the BS degree as the only professional degree and by the year 2008, all accredited pharmacy programs will award the Pharm. D. as the only professional degree in pharmacy. Some schools also offer joint programs with M.S and Ph.D degrees. These are research oriented degrees and are not intended to provide preparation for licensed pharmacy practitioner. California has eight universities which exclusively offer the Pharm.D. degree: UCSF, USC, University of the Pacific (UOP), and Western University of Health Sciences, UCSD, LLU, Touro University and Cal North State.

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK

The demands and trends are changing with the increased pharmaceutical needs of a larger and older population and greater use of medication. Pharmacy services are shifting to long-term, ambulatory, and home care settings, where opportunities for pharmacists will be best. New opportunities for pharmacists are emerging in managed care organizations, where pharmacists analyze trends and patterns in medication use for their populations of patients. Fast growth is also expected for pharmacists trained in research, disease management, and pharmacoeconomics—determining the costs and benefits of different drug therapies.

RELATED CAREERS

Persons in other professions who may work with pharmaceutical compounds are biological technicians, medical scientists, pharmaceutical chemists, and pharmacologists

PRE-PHARMACY PREPARATION

 

Requirements for admission to colleges of pharmacy vary on numerous evels including pre-requisite coursework, PCAT, and application deadlines and process. It is recommended you check the Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements Book available in the Career Center for the requirements of your institutions of choice.

TIMELINE

Beyond required coursework and PCAT preparation, the timeline for the application process begins about a year and a half prior to expected matriculation. The following is a general guideline - check with each of your institutions of choice for specific timelines.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

Some colleges require the applicant to take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) which is offered several times annually. Others also request SAT, ACT, or GRE scores. Check with the individual institutions of your choice for their particular requirements.

The PCAT consists of approximately 300 multiple-choice questions in the following individually timed sections: Verbal Ability; Quantitative Ability; Biology, Chemistry and Reading Comprehension. The scores are scaled on a range from 100-300. Percentile scores are also provided. It is recommended that students take the PCAT during the Winter or Spring of the year before applying to Pharmacy (i.e. Winter/Spring 2008 for Fall 2009 anticipated matriculation).

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process for most pharmacy schools starts approximately 18 months prior to your matriculation date (generally in your junior year unless you are applying before the completion of a bachelor's degree). The process can be complicated and time consuming. You will have to concentrate on the application process (meeting important deadlines) as well as on the activities (work, school, co-curricular activities, etc.) that you are currently pursuing.

Since the application process for Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy is individual, applicants need to prepare early by identifying potential schools and requesting application materials to meet each institution's requirements, guidelines, and deadlines. Contents of the application may include:

An official application form - deadlines vary among institutions and depend on start date, however most admit in Fall only.

Letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with your academic and professional activities - sometimes requested on specific "Letter of Reference" forms

Personal or Professional Goals Statement (essay)

Official transcripts from all previous colleges and universities attended

Application fee

Additionally, some schools require supplementary applications and invite perspective students for interviews. Check with the Pharmacy School Admission Requirements (PSAR) book for individual school's processes.

For 2008, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy is introducing a centralized application service - PharmCAS, Pharmacy College Application Service. This service will streamline the process of applying to multiple schools and colleges that participate in this program.

MAJOR & CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Students can major in almost any discipline provided the required courses are completed in order to be competitive when applying to schools of pharmacy. Pre- pharmacy students are also encouraged to participate in an internship experience in a pharmacy setting in order to become acquainted with the field prior to making formal application to selected professional programs.

REQUIRED COURSES

Most colleges of pharmacy require one to two years of pre-pharmacy coursework. Prerequisites for entry into pharmacy programs typically include biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics through college algebra/trigonometry, and perhaps one course in calculus. Additionally students are expected to complete general education courses, including humanities, social sciences, and courses emphasizing communications such as English composition and speech.

PHARMACY SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS

ADMISSION

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree program requires at least two years of specific pre-professional (undergraduate) coursework followed by four academic years (or three calendar years) of professional study. The majority of students enter a pharmacy program with three or more years of college experience. College graduates who enroll in a pharmacy program must complete the full four academic years (or three calendar) years of professional study to earn the Pharm.D. degree.

Basic to the science in pharmacy are contributions from four broad fields-mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology so courses in these basic sciences are required in pharmacy curricula. Additionally students are expected to complete general education courses, including humanities, social sciences, and courses emphasizing communications such as English composition and speech.

The courses required for admission into a pharmacy program vary significantly from one institution to the next. Due to the variations in admission requirements and procedures among the colleges and schools of pharmacy, it is advisable to research different pharmacy programs. The pharmacy programs will be pleased to supply details concerning admission or curriculum.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

Some of the 105 colleges of pharmacy require the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Testing Assessment (ACT) for admission. Many also require or recommend the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT).

For more information about PCAT go to www.pcatweb.info

PREPARATION COURSEWORK

* This list below simply gives an overview of what most Pharmacy schools are looking for in subject area that relates to courses provided at UCLA. Individual schools will determine how many courses or units you will need in the specific subject areas so it is important to consult the school for more specific information.

• BIOLOGY

Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L will satisfy one year of Biology with lab.  These courses will prepare you for the Biology section of the PCAT.

• CHEMISTRY

Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D or Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C will cover general and organic chemistry courses. Many schools will list how much lab work they are looking for in both general and organic chemistry. This can vary quite a bit amoungst schools. The chemistry coursework will prepare you for the Chemistry section of the PCAT.

• BIOCHEMISTRY

Chemistry 153A/153L (biochemistry) Some schools will require chem 153B and 153C as well, please check with them individually to confirm.

• HUMAN ANATOMY

Phy Sci 13 (offered only in the summer or through UCLA Extension)

• MICROBIOLOGY

MIMG 101 and 101L, some schools will also accept MIMG 102/102L), embryology (MCD Bio 138), histology (EE Bio 157), and cellular biology (any upper division cell biology class will work for most schools) are all recommended. Check with individual department counselors for availability of upper division courses.

• PHYSIOLOGY

Phy Sci 3, 5, 166 (whole animal or human physiology) Phy Sci 3 is offered only in the summer. Some schools require human physiology with lab. Check with individual schools.

• PHYSICS

Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.

• MATH

Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A is one year calculus. Several schools require one year of college level math. For other schools, this requirement is strongly recommended, especially as preparation for physics. The one year of math can possibly include statistics (10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*) and/or computer programming classes (PIC 10A, 10B, 10C). One quarter of statistics is required for some schools including UCLA, and strongly recommended for others. These courses will prepare you for the Quantitative Ability section of the PCAT.

 

• ENGLISH

The amount of English will differ between schools. The majority require at least two courses. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses should satisfy this requirement. A list of additional English courses that will satisfy this requirement can be found at http://career.ucla.edu/gradschool/health/englishreq.asp. These courses will prepare you for the Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension sections of the PCAT.

 

• ECONOMICS

Basic economic theory is required or strongly recommended. Econ 1 and/or 2 are possibilities to fulfill this requirement. Some schools will require micro or macro specifically.

• HUMAN BEHAVIOR
Psychology, Sociology, Cultural Anthropology or similar courses

• SPEECH

Some schools may require at least one course in speech communications/oral communication competency. This can possibly be satisfied through Comm. Studies 10 or Speech 1.

Other STRONGLY RECOMMENDED courses

• Other HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE courses are strongly recommended

Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science.

 

• COMPUTER SKILLS are highly recommended

Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. It is not necessary to take computer courses if you feel you have sufficient knowledge. Several programs are strongly recommending that students own a computer. Other programs have indicated that students will soon have to purchase a computer as part of the requirements of their program.

UCLA is not responsible for coursework being accepted by recipient schools.

In addition to academic preparation, you should evaluate your personal qualifications to meet pharmacy's demands for judgment, dependability, and conscientious performance. Pharmacists, by law, are entrusted with the proper handling and dispensing of potentially dangerous and habit-forming substances. They must have high ethical standards, communicate well with patients and other health care providers, maintain reliable records, and be knowledgeable about existing and new medications on the market to ensure each patient has optimal drug therapy results. Pre- pharmacy students are also encouraged to participate in an internship experience in a pharmacy setting in order to become acquainted with the field prior to making formal application to selected professional programs.

Useful Websites:

www.career.ucla.edu
www.aacp.org
www.pharmweb.net
www.pharmacy.org
www.ashp.org
www.pharmacist.com

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

 

HOW CAN THE UCLA CAREER CENTER HELP?
CAREER EXPLORATION

A combination of written information, experiential opportunities, testimonials or exposure to others and academic experience are helpful in exploring possible career opportunities. The career center affords various resources and services to assist students in this process including the Career Center Library, Workshops, Counseling, assessments, and special programming. A career in pharmacy requires diligence and a desire to help people. Make sure this is the career you desire and take the steps necessary to attain your goals.

HEALTH CARE RELATED INTERNSHIPS

Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis. A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, Cedar Sinai, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. Visit the Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services Office for a resource sheet handout providing an overview of health related internships. Please visit career.ucla.edu for more information.

MOCK INTERVIEW

After reviewing your materials, most schools grant interviews prior to making final decisions regarding admissions. The Career Center offers Interviewing workshops as well as an opportunity to receive a mock interview and feedback prior to your actual interviews.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

LIBRARY

Careers In Pharmacy, Brenda M. Ecclestone, ed. Pharmaceutical Press

Opportunities In Pharmacy Careers, Fred B. Gable VGM Career Horizons/NTC

The Pfizer Guide: Pharmacy Career Opportunities, 2nd ed. N.a. Merritt Communications, Inc.

Pharmacy School Admission Requirements, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Pharmacy Student Companion, The: Your Road Map To Pharmacy Education And Careers, 3rd Ed., Daniel H. Albrant & Linda R. Harteker American Pharmaceutical Association

WEB

For information on pharmacy as a career, pre-professional and professional requirements, programs offered by all the colleges of pharmacy, and student financial aid, contact:

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, 1426 Prince St., Alexandria, VA 22314. Internet: www.aacp.org

Pharm Web www.pharmweb.net

Pharmacy Virtual Library www.pharmacy.org

General information on careers in pharmacy is available from:

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, 7272 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814. Internet: www.ashp.org

American Pharmaceutical Association, 2215 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20037-2985. Internet: www.aphanet.org

National Association of Chain Drug Stores, 413 N. Lee St., P.O. Box 1417-D49, Alexandria, VA 22313-1480. Internet: www.nacds.org

Pre-Health Career Services - Physician Assistant

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

WHAT IS PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT?

Physician Assistants, or PAs, are health professionals who practice medicine under the supervision of licensed physicians.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES

PAs are qualified to provide a broad range of diagnostic, therapeutic, preventative, and health maintenance services including taking patient histories, ordering, administering, and interpreting tests, diagnosing, and treating illness, and assisting in surgery. Some states also allow PAs to write prescriptions. The responsibilities of a PA depend on the practice setting, education, experience, and state laws. Physician Assistants are employed in ambulatory, emergency and long term settings. PAs provide health care services in family and internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and other specialty care areas. PAs work with other health care providers including physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and mental health professionals.

AREAS OF SPECIALITY

Many PAs work in primary care areas such as general internal medicine, pediatrics, and family medicine. Others work in specialty areas, such as general and thoracic surgery, emergency medicine, orthopedics, and geriatrics. PAs specializing in surgery provide pre-and post-operative care and may work as first or second assistants during major surgery.

DESIRED SKILLS

Physician assistants need leadership skills, self-confidence, and emotional stability. They must be willing to continue studying throughout their career to keep up with medical advances.

EDUCATION & TRAINING

Pre-Physician Assistants students must complete specific undergraduate coursework (see Recommended Courses for Pre-Physician Assistant Students). Candidates must be graduates of an accredited program and be certified by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA). All States require that new PA's complete an accredited, formal education program. Currently there are 116 accredited or provisionally accredited PA programs, 64 award a Bachelors Degree or option. The rest offered either a certificate, an associate degree, or a master's degree. Most PA graduates have at least a bachelor's degree. The typical PA program is 24-27 months long and requires entrants to have at least two years of college and some health care experience. Some PAs pursue additional education in order to practice in specialty area such as surgery, neonatology, or emergency medicine. PA postgraduate residency training programs are available.

Pre-Professional Physician Assistant and Required Courses

Biology

Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L.

Either series satisfies one year of Biology with lab requirement.
Upper division course work in the life sciences is also recommended, especially for students in the non-science majors.

Chemistry
Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D.
Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C*.**
*Chem 30CL may not be required for applicants from the life science majors. **Western University of Health Sciences PA program will only accept the 20/30 series. Biochemistry is strongly recommended for all pre-health programs (i.e. Chem 153A/153L).

Microbiology
MIMG 101/101L. One quarter with lab. MIMG 6 is the lower division microbiology class, but does not have a lab component. One course from a community college with lab may also be acceptable.

Human Anatomy
Phy Sci 13 or 107 (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). Phy Sci 13 through UCLA Extension is another good option.

Human Physiology
Phy Sci 3* or 5 or 111A-C (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). *PS 3 has a lab component effective Summer 04. Any offerings before Summer 04 did NOT have a lab. One course from a community college with lab may also be acceptable.

English
One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses.

Other Recommended Courses

Physics

Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL 

These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.

Math
Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A
This is your preparation for calculus-based physics. One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes (PIC 10A, 10B, 10C).

Statistics
Statistics 10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*
*Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department.

Foreign Language

Knowledge and cultural competency in any language other than English is a valuable asset to working in a health care field. If your future plans include working in California or the southwestern states, Spanish is highly valued and somewhat expected. Ask yourself: Can I walk into a hospital room and get a patient history in another language? If the answer is no, then consider taking college level foreign language classes to brush up on your skills.

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record, and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer.

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK & SALARY

Employment of PAs is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through the year 2008 due to anticipated expansion of the health service industry and an emphasis on cost containment. Employment opportunities are expected to be good for physician assistants, particularly in areas or settings that have difficulty attracting physicians, such as the rural and inner city clinics. According to American Academy of Physician Assistants, there are approximately 66,000 practicing PAs in the US today with a median annual earnings of $47,090.

RELATED OCCUPATIONS

Other health workers who provide direct patient care that requires a similar level of skill and training include nurse practitioners, physical therapist, occupational therapists, clinical psychologists, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists.

Pre-Health Career Services - Physical Therapy

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

WHAT IS PHYSICAL THERAPY?

Physical Therapists, or PT's, are health professionals who evaluate and treat people of all ages with movement dysfunction and other health problems resulting from injury or disease.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES

PT's assess joint motion, muscle strength, and other body functions and structures. The treatment goals of Physical Therapists include making patients stronger, relieving their pain, helping them to regain and maintain maximum human performance, and educating patients on proper health maintenance. Treatment may include therapeutic exercise, cardiovascular endurance training, and training in activities of daily living.

Physical Therapists are employed in hospitals, private physical therapy offices, community health centers, industrial health centers, sports facilities, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, home health agencies, schools, research institutions, or teach in colleges or universities. They work with other health care providers such as physicians, occupational therapists, nurses, mental health professionals, and speech pathologists and audiologists.

SPECIALTY AREAS

Some physical therapists treat a wide range of ailments; others specialize in areas such as pediatrics, geriatrics, orthopedics, sports medicine, neurology, and cardiopulmonary physical therapy.

DESIRED SKILLS

Physical therapists should have strong interpersonal skills to successfully educate patients about their physical therapy treatments. They should also be compassionate and possess a desire to help patients. Similar traits are also needed to interact with the patient's family.

EDUCATION & TRAINING

Pre-physical therapy students must complete specific undergraduate coursework (see Recommended courses for Pre-Physical Therapy Students). According to the American Physical Therapy Association, there were 189 accredited physical therapist programs. Of the accredited programs, 24 offered bachelor's degrees, 157 offered master's degrees, and eight offered doctoral degrees. By 2002, all physical therapist programs seeking accreditation will be required to offer degrees at the master's degree level and above, in accordance with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. All states require physical therapists to pass a licensure exam after graduating from an accredited physical therapist educational program before they can practice. Physical therapists are expected to continue professional development by participating in continuing education courses and workshops. A number of states require continuing education to maintain licensure.

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK & SALARY

Employment of physical therapists is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2008. More than 120,000 physical therapists practice in the U.S. today. As stated by the American Physical Therapy Association, average annual income is approximately $56,000, depending on geographic location and setting.

RELATED OCCUPATIONS

Physical Therapists rehabilitate persons with physical disabilities. Others who work in the rehabilitation field include occupational therapists, speech pathologists, audiologists, orthodontists, prosthetics, and respiratory therapists.

PREPARATION FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAMS

Admission to entry-level physical therapy programs is extremely competitive due to a large number of qualified applicants.

Admissions committees are very selective and are looking for specific prerequisites courses, strong academic records, good scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), quality letters of recommendation, and work or volunteer experience in the field as indicators of potential to succeed.

APPLICATION TIMELINE AND ACCEPTANCE INFORMATION

Application deadlines vary from November of the year prior to matriculation to February. Most programs require a bachelors degree, however some universities, such as Loma Linda University and Cal State Northridge, encourage students to apply after completing two years of college level work. If admitted, students enter a three-year Masters program and are awarded a BS in life science in addition to the masters degree at the completion of the program.

MINIMUM GPA (RECOMMENDED)

Most programs require a student to have at least a 3.0 cumulative and prerequisite GPA, although competitive GPA's may be higher. Increasingly, programs are also requiring applicants to have paid or volunteer experience in one or more physical therapy settings and may ask that a student have adult CPR certification.

MAJOR & CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Students can major in almost any discipline provided the required courses are completed in order to be competitive when applying to physical therapy programs. Students are encouraged to participate in an internship, volunteer, or work experience in a physical therapy setting in order to become acquainted with the field prior to making formal application to selected professional programs.

Pre-Professional Physical Therapy and Required Courses

The following list of UCLA courses is recommended for pre-physical therapy students. This list is not a comprehensive list of prerequisites for all masters programs in physical therapy. Requirements can vary widely from program to program. The summary of course requirement for programs participating in PTCAs is also helpful and may be found at www.ptcas.org/PTCASCrsPrereq2010_11_forApplicants.pdf. Students maintain responsibility for verifying course selection with individual PT programs.

Biology

Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L.

Either series satisfies one year of Biology with lab requirement.
Upper division course work in the life sciences is also recommended, especially for students in the non-science majors.

 

Human Anatomy

Phy Sci 13 or 107 (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). Phy Sci 13 through UCLA Extension is another good option.

Human Physiology

Phy Sci 166* or Phy Sci 3** or 5 or 111A-C (upper division PS courses are generally restricted to PS majors). *Phy Sci 166 may not be acceptable for schools that will not take Animal Physiology prerequisites. **PS 3 has a lab component effective Summer 04. Any offerings before Summer 04 did NOT have a lab. One course from a community college with lab may also be acceptable.

Chemistry
Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D.

Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C.*

*Chem 30CL may not be required for applicants from the life science majors.

Psychology

Requirements vary by program. Psych 10 plus 2 upper division classes are helpful. Other topics can include Neuroscience and Gerontology.

Physics

Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.

Math
Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A

This is your preparation for calculus-based physics. One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes (PIC 10A, 10B, 10C).

 

Other Recommended Courses

Other Biology
Check with each individual department counselor for availability of upper division courses.

Neurobiology - Any upper division neuroscience or psychobiology course. Check course restrictions.

Kinesiology - Phy Sci C150 and C152. Upper division Phy Sci classes are generally restricted to Phy Sci majors. These courses can also be found at the CSU level.

Exercise Physiology - Phy Sci 133, 136 and C137. Upper division Phy Sci classes are generally restricted to Phy Sci majors. These courses can also be found at the CSU level.

English

One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses.

Statistics
Statistics 10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*

*Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department.

Foreign Language

Knowledge and cultural competency in any language other than English is a valuable asset to working in a health care field. If your future plans include working in California or the southwestern states, Spanish is highly valued and somewhat expected. Ask yourself: Can I walk into a hospital room and get a patient history in another language? If the answer is no, then consider taking college level foreign language classes to brush up on your skills.

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record, and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer.

Students can obtain more information by visiting the web site address: www.apta.org or writing to: American Physical Therapy Association, 111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314-1488, 703.684.2782

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION & RESOURCES

More information on a career as a physical therapist and a list of accredited educational programs in physical therapy are available from American Physical Therapy Association, 111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314-1488, 703.684.2782, www.apta.org

Pre-Health Career Services - Veterinary

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

WHAT IS VETERINARY MEDICINE?

Veterinarians play a major role in the health care of pets, livestock, and zoo, sporting, and laboratory animals. Some veterinarians use their skills to protect humans against diseases carried by animals and conduct clinical research on human and animal health problems. Others work in basic research, broadening the scope of fundamental theoretical knowledge, and in applied research, developing new ways to use knowledge. Most veterinarians perform clinical work in private practices.

AREAS OF SPECIALTY

Private Practice: The majority of veterinarians are owners of a private practice but, as in the other health professions, group practices are becoming increasingly more common. The practice may concentrate on large animals, small animals, or a combination of the two. Small animal practices have traditionally treated dogs and cats but veterinarians in these practices are seeing growing numbers of pet birds and exotic animals, including reptiles. Large animal practices often emphasize either horses or cows and work is done both on a farm-call and an in-clinic basis. As the number of pork-producing farms and goat and sheep herds increases, practitioners are also receiving more calls to treat these animals. Some practices are restricted to a certain type of caseload. An example is an emergency clinic, which only sees patients on an emergency or "after hours" basis. The mobile clinic or ambulatory unit has gained popularity in recent years with its ability to bring veterinary medical care directly to the patient. Specialty practices may also restrict caseloads to specific problems, offering specialized care and facilities in cardiology, equine supports medicine, neurology, ophthalmology, surgery, avian medicine, embryo transfer, dermatology, or radiology.

Private Industry: There are many opportunities for veterinarians in private industry, particularly in the fields of nutrition and pharmaceuticals. Veterinarians may help develop new products for animals, work in drug research for a pharmaceutical company, diagnose disease and drug effects as pathologists, or safeguard the health of laboratory animal colonies. Veterinarians are also employed by zoos and aquariums and may act as consultants to wildlife preservation groups or game farms.

Government Agencies: Many government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels employ veterinarians in regulatory and public health work. This work may include the administration of meat and/or animal quarantines, herd health checks for diseases transmissible to man, or the care and maintenance of wildlife within state or federal parks or coastal regions.

Military: Veterinarians are employed in the Army Veterinary Corps and as Environmental Health Officers in the Air Force.

Academic Institutions: Academic institutions, particularly schools of veterinary medicine, employ veterinarians as clinicians, researchers, and teachers. Specifically, they may function as pathologists, microbiologists, behaviorists, pharmacologists, anatomists, or specialists with the fields of cardiology, dermatology, surgery, avian or aquatic medicine, equine physiology, and many other areas.

DESIRED SKILLS AND ATTRIBUTES

Students who wish to become veterinarians must demonstrate ambition and an eagerness to work with animals. In addition to satisfying preveterinary course and testing requirements, veterinary medical colleges weigh heavily a candidate's veterinary and animal experience. Formal experience, such as work with veterinarians or scientists in clinics, agribusiness, research or some other area of health science is particularly advantageous. Less formal experience, such as working with animals on a farm or ranch or at a stable or animal shelter is also helpful.

EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK

Employment of veterinarians is expected to grow faster than average for all occupations through the year 2008. Employment openings stemming from the need to replace veterinarians who retire or otherwise leave the labor force will be almost as numerous as new jobs resulting from employment growth over the 1998-2008 period.

RELATED CAREERS

Veterinarians prevent, diagnose, and treat disorders and injuries in animals. Those who do similar work for humans include chiropractors, dentists, optometrists, physicians, and podiatrists.

Pre-Professional Veterinary Medicine

Biology

Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, 4, 23L or Life Science 7A, 7B, 7C, 23L.
The following course work is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED OR REQUIRED for most schools:

Physiology (Phy Sci 166), Microbiology (MIMG 101/100L), genetics LS 107, embryology (MCD Bio 138), and cellular biology (any upper division cell biology class will work for most schools) are all recommended.  Check with individual department counselors for availability of upper division courses.

Chemistry

Life science or non-science majors: Chemistry 14A, 14B/BL, 14C/CL, 14D; plus 153A/L (biochemistry).

Physical, life or non-science majors: Chemistry 20A, 20B/L, 30A/AL, 30B/BL, 30C*; plus 153A/L (biochemistry). *Chem 30CL may not be required for applicants from the life science majors. General and organic chemistry courses are required. Many schools include a separate requirement for or a strong recommendation to take biochemistry. The chemistry coursework will prepare you for the Chemistry section of the VCAT.

 

Physics

Physics 5A, 5B, 5C or 6A, 6B, 6C or 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL
These courses satisfy one year of Physics with lab requirement. Trigonometry-based physics can also satisfy this requirement.  UCLA offers only calculus-based courses.

Math
Math 3A, 3B, 3C or 31A, 31B, 32A

This is your preparation for calculus-based physics. Several schools require one year of college level math. For other schools, this requirement is strongly recommended, especially as preparation for physics. One year of math can include statistics (see below) and computer programming classes

(PIC 10A, 10B, 10C). These courses will prepare you for the Quantitative Ability section of the VCAT.

Statistics
Statistics 10, M11, M12, 13, Biostatistics or Biomath, Psychology 100A*

One quarter of statistics is required for some schools including UCLA and strongly recommended for others. *Check with individual schools for acceptability of classes offered outside of the Statistics department. These courses will prepare you for the Quantitative Ability section of the VCAT.

 

Other recommended or required courses

 

Other Biology

Physiology, microbiology, genetics, embryology, and cellular biology are all recommended. Check with each individual department counselor for availability of upper division courses.

 

Physiology Phy Sci M166 (usually offered in the summer)

 

Genetics Life Science 4 or MCD Bio CM156

 

Embryology MCD Bio 138

 

Cell Biology Any upper division cell biology class will work for most schools (e.g. EE Bio/PS M158, any MCD Biology class)

 

Microbiology
MIMG 101/101L (or some schools will also accept MIMG 102/102L)

One year of college level literature and composition. Writing I and Writing II courses, select general education literature courses, and any upper division English literature or English Composition courses will satisfy this requirement. Please see the “English requirement for health professions schools” sheet for a complete list of suggested courses. These courses will prepare you for the Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension sections of the VCAT.

Foreign Language

Knowledge and cultural competency in any language other than English is a valuable asset to working in a health care field. If your future plans include working in California or the southwestern states, Spanish is highly valued and somewhat expected. Ask yourself: Can I walk into a hospital room and get a patient history in another language? If the answer is no, then consider taking college level foreign language classes to brush up on your skills.

Other Humanities and Social Science courses are strongly recommended. The non-science GPA is an important component to your overall academic record and liberal arts education. Courses in the following can enhance your communication skills and overall understanding of the world: Anthropology, Communication Studies, Economics, any ethnic studies area (e.g. Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, Afro-American Studies, Chicana/Chicano Studies, Near Eastern Studies), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Speech to name a few.

Computer skills are strongly recommended. Many programs have incorporated computers and electronic media into their curriculum. Several programs are strongly recommending that a student owns a computer. Other programs have indicated that they will soon have the purchase of a computer as part of the requirements of their program.

ANIMAL AND VETERINARY EXPERIENCE

Experience in veterinary clinics and in research laboratories is strongly encouraged. Some schools require a minimum of 300 hours of veterinary medical exposure and animal experience by fall of the year you are applying to the school. (UC Davis requires 180 hrs.) Try to become involved with animals and/or working in a veterinary practice. Such involvement could consist of breeding, rearing, feeding, and showing various species of animals including companion animals, livestock, laboratory animals, zoo animals, or wildlife. The importance of working with a veterinarian before applying to veterinary school is vital and all animal experience is helpful and will look favorable on an application. The current trend seems to be that most veterinary colleges favor those applicants with a significant number of hours working in a veterinary setting. For example, currently at UC Davis, those applicants who were admitted into the veterinary or biomedical programs had an average of 2,000 hours working in a veterinary setting.

STANDARDIZED TESTS AND TIMELINES

Most veterinary medical colleges require one or more standardized tests: the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT), or Graduate Record Examinations (GRE). Check with your schools of interest to find out which standardized exam is required. Please note that although a few veterinary schools accept the MCAT, most of them want the GRE.

The best time to take the exams is in the spring or summer prior to the year you plan to enter veterinary school. Application materials for any of the exams can be picked up at the Pre-Professional Services Office.

APPLICATION PROCESS

In addition to taking the required exams, you will need to contact each veterinary medical school you want to attend to find out if they participate in VMCAS. The Veterinary Medical Colleges Application Service (VMCAS) is a centralized application service, which provides for the collection, processing, verification and distribution of applicant data to the participating colleges for their use in the applicant selection process. VMCAS applications are available in July at the Pre-Professional Services office. Applications should be returned by late summer of the year prior to entering.

MINIMUM GPA (RECOMMENDED)

Schools vary in terms of the GPA of their entering classes but most schools require GPA's of 2.8 or above. Aside from cumulative GPA, applicants are evaluated on the basis of science GPA, experience and achievements in veterinary and animal related work, research, letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities, maturity and broad cultural perspective, and motivation and dedication to the veterinary career.

CHOOSING A SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

There are currently 28 veterinary medical schools in the United States, the newest one is part of Western University in Pomona, CA, and four schools are in Canada. Many schools restrict acceptance to residents of their own state. Therefore, applying to an in-state school increases your chances of being accepted. In addition, students typically pay less tuition at in-state schools than at out-of state institutions. This, however, should not limit you to in-state schools, especially considering that the only veterinary school in California is at UC Davis. Be sure to check the Veterinary Medical School Admissions Requirements (VMSAR) catalog, available at the Pre-Professional Services Office, regarding the admissions and residency requirements of out-of-state veterinary schools. Further information may also be obtained on the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges website: www.aavmc.org.

For a list of U.S. schools and colleges of veterinary medicine, send a letter sized self addressed stamped envelope to:

American Veterinary Medical Association
1931 N. Meacham Rd., Suite 100
Schaumburg, IL 60173
www.avma.org

For further information on veterinary education, write to:
Association of American Veterinary Colleges
1101 Vermont Ave. NW, Suite 710
Washington, DC 20005

All programs at schools of veterinary medicine lead to a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.). They require four years of post-baccalaureate work and, following graduation, students must pass the required tests and/or practical examinations of the state in which they wish to practice.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

HOW CAN THE UCLA CAREER CENTER HELP?

The Career Center offers a wide range of workshops to assist you in preparing for graduate and professional school. Workshop topics range from Graduate School Planning to Resume Writing and Mock Interviewing. In addition, a number of special programs and panels related to the healthcare/veterinary field are planned for Career Week to be held in January. A list of workshops and special programs can be found on the Career Center's web site: career.ucla.edu

PERSONAL STATEMENT

For assistance with developing the personal statement, the Career Center Resources Library houses several publications on this topic. In addition, the Career Center will be conducting workshops on Developing a Winning Personal Statement in conjunction with Academics in the Commons. For assistance in developing your personal statement, Composition tutors are able to assist students in the writing process, contact Academics in the Commons (228 Covel Commons) at 310.206.1493. Once your personal statement has been critiqued, you may also want to have a final review by a Career Counselor at the UCLA Career Center. The first step would be to arrange a drop-in counseling appointment. Consult the Career Centers' web site listed above for more information about drop-in counseling hours and personal statement workshops.

HEALTH CARE RELATED INTERNSHIPS

Experiential educational and volunteer programs are an excellent way to expand your knowledge of the health professions beyond the classroom. Participation in health related internships will strengthen your application to professional schools and provide exposure experiences that can be highlighted in the personal statement. A select number of health care internships focusing on research, legislation and public policy are available through the Career Center's internship office on a local, national and international basis. A sampling of internship opportunities include (but are not limited to) the National Institute of Health, the Surgeon General's Office, Cedar Sinai, AIDS Action, the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and the American Heart Association. Visit the Career Center's Internship and Study Abroad Services Office for a resource sheet handout providing an overview of health related internships. Please visit career.ucla.edu for more information.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Most veterinary schools require three to four letters of recommendation, with a minimum of two from science professors and one from a person for whom you have worked, such as a veterinarian. The Career Center offers UCLA students and alumni a service which stores and sends letters of recommendation to graduate schools. To open a PPS letter file, visit career.ucla.edu. All letters should be forwarded directly to the career center by the author, as these are confidential documents.

VETERINARY RELATED BOOKS

(Available in the UCLA Career Center Resource Lab)

Opportunities in Veterinary Medicine Careers, Swope,Robert E. (VGM Career Horizons)
Pre-Veterinary Planning Guide, Crawford, Jane Diehl (Betz Publishing Company)

Veterinary Medical Schools Admissions Requirements in the U.S. American Assoc. of Veterinary Colleges (Purdue University Press)

VETERINARY RELATED WEB SITES

American Veterinary Medical Association www.avma.org

FDA site: Center for Veterinary Medicine

www.fda.gov/cvm/default.htm

CAREER INFORMATION

For information on Federal agencies that employ veterinarians, write to:

National Association of Federal Veterinarians
1101 Vermont Ave. NW, Suite 710
Washington DC 20005

Pre-Health Career Services - Health Care Internships

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.


Health Care Internships are available in Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Francisco, New York, and Washington, DC

Drop-In Counseling

All drop-in counseling and information sessions are held at the UCLA Career Center, Internship & Study Abroad Services, 501 Westwood Plaza, Strathmore Building, Room 200, 310.825.0831.

Los Angeles

Planned Parenthood

Undergraduate or graduate students will present pregnancy prevention and adolescent self-esteem programs to junior high and elementary school students throughout the Los Angeles County.

AIDS Project Los Angeles

Internships are available in the following areas: Benefits Program, Buddy Program, Client Relations, Dental Clinic, Grantwriting, Government Affairs, Fundraising, Mental Health, Nutrition, Publications, Sex Vibe! Magazine, Special Events and Volunteer Resources.

Center for Health Care Rights

The Case Aide/Community Education Intern will provide client care assistance and participate in community education projects. Interns will develop hands-on skills in counseling, health policy, and community advocacy; assist the elderly and disable populations of Los Angeles County with their health insurance needs. The intern will gain knowledge and expertise on Medicare, Medi-Cal, managed care, long-term care coverage and other government assistance programs. The intern will also learn how to develop and implement community education programs for low-income and underserved communities.

Foothill Presbyterian Hospital, Dept. of Education & Outreach

The Community Education Department conducts health education classes, health-screening programs, and provides other collaborated services to the local community. Projects that the intern may work on will include the following: community needs assessment, worksite wellness program, community information and referrals, and community health fairs. Intern will also work closely with Public Relations, Foundation, Center for the Partially Sighted, and Business Development.

March of Dimes – Walk America Internship

The March of Dimes offers an opportunity to help conceptualize and develop the youth component of WalkAmerica. The intern will be responsible for helping recruit new walk teams by promoting WalkAmerica to local elementary and high school students in the central Los Angeles area.


Women’s Care Cottage

A social service agency for women and children. Volunteer Coordinator will design a volunteer program for our volunteers, including design of handbook, training opportunities, appreciation methodology, identification of resources in the community, and setting up speakers.


American Lung Association

The Association conducts a variety of educational programs and community services for the general public, lung disease patients and their families, health care providers, students and teachers. Internships are available in the following programs: Community Health Services, Tuberculosis Education, Children’s Lung Health and Asthma, Adult Lung Health, Smoking Cessation, and Public Health Advocacy.


The American Parkinson Disease Association

Interns will learn the workings of a non-profit organization dedicated to helping those in need and learn about philanthropy. Individual will be able to work closely with staff members and have a great deal of hands-on experience.


City of Long Beach, Dept. of Health and Human Services - Youth Health Education Programs

The Youth Health Education Program operates six programs that provide education and prevention services for youth with respect to HIV/AIDS, STDs, pregnancy and parenting. These multi-session behavior change and skills-building programs have established links with community agencies, LBUSD, and colleges in the greater Long Beach area to provide prevention education to in-school, out-of-school, probated, incarcerated, pregnant and parenting youth.


Asiacapital Public Health, Inc.

Asiacapital Public Health is an internet service provider for the health industry. Students will acquire, organize, and input information relative to the health industry necessary for website construction.

 

Community Health Sciences 199

Enroll in a Community Health Sciences internship this quarter! Excellent opportunities are available for students interested in medicine, dentistry, public health, social welfare, health administration, and other health-related fields. Internships are offered in Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters of 2001-02. You can earn four graded units, learn by serving your community, interact one-on-one with faculty, and prepare for graduate school.

 

Bay Area

 

American Heart Association

Students are assigned to leading research laboratories in California, Nevada, and Utah for a ten-week period during the summer to work under the supervision of experienced scientists. The projects range from basic molecular research to direct physiological studies.


Beyond AIDS Foundation

Beyond AIDS is an international, non-profit organization that is committed to developing a sound public health policy for HIV. Interns will gain experience in public health, political science, law and legislation, and health care.


Hall of Health

Hall of Health is a hands-on health museum. Interns will give talks on health and the human body (training provided), assist children with interactive exhibits, assist with office work, and do special projects of their choice on evaluation, exhibit development, or educational programming.


Medi-Cal Policy Institute

The Medi-Cal Policy Institute is an organization whose mission is to assist in the development of effective policy solutions which will best serve the interest of Medi-Cal recipients. Interns will assist institute analysts in researching issues related to California’s Medicaid program – Medi-cal.


Northern California Cancer Center

Master’s Degree Student Internship Registry Research: Interns will carry out data analyses epidemiological studies using SAS and other statistical software. Helps to design pertinent analyses as they relate to specific research questions/hypotheses. Documents all analyses including programs, output and summary tables. Works closely with Epidemiologists in writing publishable scientific paper(s) which describe the research findings.


Project Inform

Internship positions are formatted to match the needs of the department and the individual. The positions vary from three months to a year. Internships are available in the following departments: Administration, Advocacy/Information, Communications, Constituent Services, Development, Hotline, Outreach & Education, Public Policy, Treatment Hotline, Volunteer & Intern Services.


Roche Pharmaceuticals

Summer Internship program provides opportunities for undergraduate juniors and seniors to gain hands-on experience in a focused, highly productive setting. Working under the guidance of a Roche mentor, interns will be assigned significant projects in their field of study and will give a formal presentation of project results at the end of the program.


Sugen Summer Internship Program

Ten-twelve week internship during the summer, where interns will have an opportunity to work with scientists and research professionals who have dedicated their lives in search of treatments for some of humanity’s major diseases and disorders.


UCSF AIDS Health Projects

 

1. HIV Counseling and Testing Program: Interns working with this unit have some of the closest contact with the agency’s clientele. They field calls from individuals wanting to make an appointment to take an HIV test or needing basic information about HIV. They also meet clients face to face at AHP test sites throughout San Francisco. After two extensive training sessions, interns are awarded California State Certification in HIV Counseling and Testing.

 


2. Research Program: Interns are responsible for designing and implementing all of the agency’s research projects, assisting in writing, editing and proofreading of grant proposals.

 


3. Psychosocial Support Services: The PSS Intern assists with the daily administrative tasks of the program including data entry, maintaining client files, preparing correspondence, and assuring that the clinical staff receive the support needed.

 


4. Publications Program: Intern will serve as staff level research assistant and write for FOCUS and PERSPECTIVES. In researching their topics, interns have the unique opportunity to investigate current research projects and consult with researchers, physicians, social workers, outreach workers, and other professionals working in the HIV field.

 


5. REACH Program: Intern will assist all daily activities, including production, dissemination, and management of client data forms and surveys, and data entry. In addition, intern assists in the design of publicity for specialized workshops, forums, and other community events to educate individuals about HIV prevention.

 


6. Training Program: Intern will participate in the research of HIV statistics, psychosocial issues, legal issues and medication update.

 


7. AHP Services Center Operations: The Operations Intern will assist with the production and dissemination of forms, flyers, notices, and manuals and will assist with data compilation for monthly statistic reports.

New York

Chinatown Health Clinic
Project AHEAD is an eight-week long summer program geared towards college students with an interest in pursuing a career in the health care field. It consists of a field placement in area hospitals, seminars and workshops, and participation in the development and completion of a community health project.

Pre-Health Career Services English Requirement

The UCLA Career Center offers personal assistance and programs on the graduate and professional school application process, including program selection, the personal statement, faculty recommendations, admissions tests, and financial assistance. Please review this section of our web site for important information you should consider and think about as you plan your coursework.

UCLA courses that satisfy the English requirement for health professions schools:

Introduction

The following courses will each satisfy part of the “one-year English requirement” for most professional schools in the health sciences. In addition, many of these courses will also satisfy the College of Letters & Science Writing II requirement, or L&S General Education requirements.

*Note that the L&S General Education requirements are new for students that enter Fall 02 and after. Anyone that has entered BEFORE Fall 02 should follow the old GE structure. In addition, some courses will only satisfy the new GE structure, and not the old one. Check with your college advising unit listed below for more details.*

The general rule is that courses offered through the English department and any course satisfying the Writing II requirement (indicated by a “W” after the course number) will satisfy part of the English requirement for professional schools in the health sciences.

*Please check with individual schools for final confirmation of these selections.*

To fulfill one year of English, we recommend that you take one literature course; one composition/expository writing course (Writing Programs and “W” courses included in this category); and one additional course in either literature or composition. The “W” provides a “writing intensive” notation on your official transcript. Please feel free to take more! Additional courses in composition and literature can both enhance your application, and help your performance on exams such as the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), Dental Admissions Test (DAT), Optometry Admissions Test (OAT), etc.

Course List

The following grid lists recommended courses in alphabetical order by department. These courses are not necessarily offered each quarter, or each academic year. Check the Schedule of Classes each quarter for availability. Courses that have more than one category checked DO NOT automatically satisfy more than one requirement. Check with your College advising office for details:

  • AAP students go to 1209 Campbell Hall;
  • College Honors students go to A-311 Murphy Hall;
  • Student Athletes go to the Morgan Center; and
  • all other College of Letters & Science students go to A-316 Murphy Hall to verify GE, Writing I and II requirements.
  • Engineering students go to 6426 Boelter Hall;
  • Arts & Architecture students go to 194 Kinross Building South; and
  • Theater, Film & Television students go to 103 East Melnitz

Consult the catalog for course descriptions.

Course# and Title Writing I Writing II GE#
Ancient Near East 10W – Jerusalem: The Holy City X X
Applied Ling. & TESL 101W – Intro to Language X X
Learning and Language Teaching
Classics 41W – Discovering Roman Literature X X
Comp Lit 2AW – Survey of Literature X X
Comp Lit 2BW – Survey of Literature X X
Comp Lit 2CW – Survey of Literature X X
Comp Lit 2DW – Survey of Literature X X
Comp Lit 4AW – Literature and Writing X X
Comp Lit 4BW – Literature and Writing X X
Comp Lit 4CW – Literature and Writing X X
Comp Lit 4DW – Literature and Writing X X
East Asian Lan & Cul 60W – Intro to Buddhism X
English 3 – English Comp, Rhetoric, and Language X
English 3H – English Comp, Rhet, and Lan. (Hnrs) X
English 4W** – Critical Reading and Writing X X
English 4HW** – Crit. Reading &Writing (Honors) X X
English 10A – English Lit to 1660 X
English 10B – English Lit to 1660-1832 X
English 30W – Intermediate Academic Writing X
English 70 – Major British Authors before 1800 X
English 75 – Major British Authors 1800-present X
English 80 – Major American Authors X
English 85 – American Novel X
English 90 – Shakespeare X
English 95A – Intro to Poetry X
English 95B – Intro to Drama X
English 95C – Intro to Fiction X
English 100W – Interdisciplinary Academic Writing X
English 129A-D – Academic Writing in the Disc.
English 131A-D – Specialized Writing
Any upper division English course is okay
French 14W – Intro to French Civilization X X
General Education cluster classes Fall 02 and after X X
German 60W – War X X
German 62W – Technoscience and German Culture X X
History 10BW – Intro to Civ. Of Africa since 1800 X X
HC 21W – Rise and Fall of Modernism X X
HC 22W – Intro to Ethical Theory X X
HC 32W – Creativity and Culture X X
HC 33W – Art of Engagement X X
HC 38W – Body-Mind Literacy X X
HC 40W – Transformations of Cultural Stories X X
HC 41W – A Thousand Worlds: Literature of Renaissance Art X X

Renaissance Art HC 46W – Literature of Testimony

X X
HC 59W – Lit. & Culture of the American South X X
HC 83W – Politics and Rhetoric of Literature X X
Life Science 2W^ – Cells, Tissues and Organs X X
Music History 12W – Writing about Music X X
Philosophy 22W – Intro to Ethical Theory X X
Russian 25W – Russian Novel in Translation X X
Russian 99BW – Russian Civ. In the 20th Century X X
Scandinavian 50W – Intro to Scandinavian Lit. X X

# Some of these courses will not fulfill the new L&S General Education requirement after Fall 02. Check with your college advising unit listed above for more details.

**English 4W and 4HW are pre-requisites for the English major and minor. Due to the high demand for this class, please choose an alternative whenever possible.

^Please check with individual schools about their acceptance of science-based writing courses.